Textbook Notes (368,430)
Canada (161,877)
POLS 2250 (94)
Chapter 6

Chapter 6.docx

6 Pages
90 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 2250
Professor
Nanita Mohan
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 6: Crown Corporations: Words used to denote a organization: crown corporation, mixed enterprise, joint enterprise, and  public enterprise. Crown corporations:  ­established through their own legislation or through incorporation under  the  federal or provincial companies ­one authority defines crown corporations as “companies in the ordinary  sense  of the tern whose mandate relates to industrial, commercial, or  financial  crown or whose sole shareholder is the government or the crown. ­however this definition leaves out certain noncommercial entities t hat are defined as crown corporations in law at the federal level (e.g  the Canada employment insurance company” ­it is important that an organization that carries out government policy be  closely  controlled by the political execution  ­however, when an organization has a predominantly commercial mandate,  political concerns might interfere with that mandate Classification: ­the federal government classifies its corporate holdings in a number of  different categories.  ­“parent corporations”: are corporations that are one hundred percent  owned  by the federal government ­e.g. Canada post corporation is for instance responsible to the minister of  national revenue, while the Canadian dairy commission reports to the  minister of agriculture and agri­food.  ­these parents corporations can be further classified into two categories,  agency  corporations and proprietary corporations.  ­There are also three classes of subsidiaries of a parent corporation 1.) “Wholly owned subsidiaries”  2.) “other subsidiaries” 3.) “associates” ­There are four other types of corporations that are less directly controlled by the  federal government.  ­“mixed enterprises” are corporations whose shares are owned partly by the  government of Canada and partly by private sector parties.  ­There are now no mixed enterprises at the federal level.  ­“joint enterprises” are similar to mixed enterprises except that the other  shareholder is another level of government ­The “Shared governance” entity is another type of corporate form.  ­The government has no financial interest in these bodies, but can  participate in the appointment or nomination of individuals to their  governing structures.  ­e.g. the agricultural and food council of Alberta ­“international enterprises” are corporate entities created pursuant to I international agreements, under which Canada holds shares or has a right to  appoint or elect some number of members to a governing body.  ­ex. International monetary fund ­“public enterprises” is the most general term, usually used to encompass all  the above terms Structure and operation of crown corporations: ­at the top sits the chair of the board of directors and other members of the board ­their job is to provide the overall directions for the company ­Reporting to the board is the president and chief executive officer (CEO)  ­he/she is responsible for the management and day to day activities  ­unlike board members who are typically part time, CEO’s are fulltime  ­Below them, we find the full time employees Changing trends in public enterprise: ­Governments grew very rapidly in the 60’s and 70’s. ­recently, growth has slowed down and the size of the corporate sector has decline in a  growing trend of privatization. ­However, currently the sector has stabilized and even experienced a little growth.  The federal Scene: ­in 1967 there were sixty seven parent crown corporations but by 2005 this number had  fallen to forty three.  ­the net effect has been to reduce the overall presence of most forms of crown  corporations.  ­Federal crown corporations are major employers and their assets are impressive. ­e.x. Canada post corporation has over 52,000 employees and has assets worth nearly 4.3  billion dollars ­overall the number of employees and levels of assets have declined over time.  ­activities which federal crown corporations have been involved in has also changed over  the years.  ­after confederation, the federal government was mostly concerned with nation building  and so focused on transpiration undertakings ­during ww2 the major theme of public policy changed from national unity to national  defense ­since the war ended, federal crown corporations have become more involved in the areas  of finance, insurance and real estate.  The provincial scene: ­industrial development, liquor sales, housing, power generation, and research and  development have been among the more prominent fields in which crown corporations  have been established at the provincial level. ­Saskatchewan has established a number of crown corporations to provide a more  diversified economy. ­Quebec is another province that relied heavily on crown corporations for economic  development.  ­hydro Quebec is the most prominent of Quebec’s crown corporations ­activities of provincial crown corporations has changed ­previously power generation was most important ­no, they have become involved for industrial and resource development  areas Rationale for Crown corporations: ­the federal government has used, and continues to use crown corporations to deliver  public policy wen the private sector, other levels of government, or feeral departments  and agencies cannot satisfy adequately the needs and interest of Canadians.  Nation building, community development, and externalities: ­most common rationale for the creation of public enterprises in Canada has been the  need to make investments necessary for nation building and community. ­such investments which have included the establishment of crown corporations in the  areas of telephone services and air and rail travel, amount to an attempt to provide for  what are called externalities. ­externalities are both positive and negative ­positive externalities: producers and consumers in the marketplace fail to take  into sufficient consideration that their exchange may have beneficial  effects on  people outside the transaction.  ­in Canada’s history the private market has been unwilling to supply rail or air travel in  amounts necessary for the building of this country  ­response of government: create more crown corporations to make up for the deficiency. ­negative externalities: two parties engaged in a market transaction may this time cause  harm to others, but the transaction continues nevertheless because the market provides no  way to force the two parties to pay for this cost ­governments may affect market behavior indirectly by imposing a fine or some  other cost National Goals and public goods: ­external spillover effects of market transactions represent such a large proportion of the  total gains that no private sector actor is willing to supply a particular good or service  even if society benefits from it. ­national security, public safety, and effective transportation are only a few of the public  goods that emerge in societies.  ­e.x. CBC was established to instill in Canadians a sense of their culture. Natural Mo
More Less

Related notes for POLS 2250

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit