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Canada (162,369)
POLS 3210 (19)
Chapter 1

Contested Federalism - Chapter One

3 Pages
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Department
Political Science
Course Code
POLS 3210
Professor
Julie Simmons

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POLS 3210 Contested FederalismChapter OneFederalism may be defined in terms of the division of power on the basis of territory or geography rather than function By dividing authority between two or more orders of governmentto provide representation for territorial religious linguistic or ethnic differences in the decisionmaking structures of the statecreates conditions that may entrench differences over timeThis chapter is about the origins of the federal ideaprinciple along with different schools of thought regarding diversity and societal differences in federal systemsFederalISM set of beliefs about the correct way to organize political lifeit is complicated must maintain unity between diverse parts and allow them to flourish and express their differences in tangible policy choicesFederalism endorses the ideafor the purpose of governance different communities may need some degree of unity without being strictly unified Represents a want for balance between concentrated power at a national level and dispersion of power to provinces confederal allianceThe Origins Of Federalism Ancient ideacan be traced back to medieval or earlier Dutch and Swiss In North America Iroquoisformed confederacy Plan for the first modern federationAm
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