Textbook Notes (369,067)
Canada (162,366)
Psychology (3,337)
PSYC 1010 (57)
c (11)
Chapter 13

Chapter 13.docx

2 Pages
44 Views

Department
Psychology
Course Code
PSYC 1010
Professor
c

This preview shows 80% of the first page. Sign up to view the full 2 pages of the document.
Description
Chapter 13: Correlation March 28 th Correlation - Co-relation between two variables (ex. junk food vs. body fat) The Characteristics of Correlation - Correlation Coefficient- statistic that quantifies a relation between two variables - Linear relation- data forms an overall pattern for which a straight line may be drawn through - Three main characteristics of correlation coefficient: 1. The correlation coefficient can be either positive or negative 2. The correlation coefficient always falls between -1.00 and 1.00 3. It is the strength (magnitude) of the coefficient (not the sign) that indicates how large it is - Positive Correlation- an association between two variables such that participants with high scores on one variable tend to have high scores on the other variable as well, those with low scores on one variable tend to have low scores on the other variable also (high or low on both variables)  Describes a situation in which participants have similar scores in relation to the mean and spread on both variables  Data points move up and down together - Negative Correlation- an association between two variables in which participants with high scores on one variable tend to have low scores on the other variable (high on one variable, low on the other variable)  Correlation coefficient of -1.00 indicates a perfect negative correlation (every point on the scatterplot falls in one line)  Data points move up and down opposite to eachother - Correlation of 0.00 falls right in the middle of the two extremes- indicating no correlation (no association between the two variables) - Strength of the correlation is determine by how close to “perfect the data points are- closer to the “line”=closer to perfect - Correlation does not indicate causation  The first variable might cause the second variable  The second variable might cause the first
More Less
Unlock Document

Only 80% of the first page are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit