Textbook Notes (368,245)
Canada (161,733)
Psychology (3,337)
PSYC 2360 (100)
Chapter 5

Chapter 5 – Reliability and Validity.doc

3 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 2360
Professor
Carol Anne Hendry
Semester
Summer

Description
Chapter 5 – Reliability and Validity Random and Systematic Error • Random Error: chance fluctuations in measurement that influence scores on  measured variables  o Can happen by misreading or misunderstanding of the questions,  measurement of participants on different days or different places,  misprinting of questions, misreporting of answers o Random error is self cancelling because some errors will increase some  peoples scores and some errors will decrease some peoples score, thus  cancelling each others out • Systematic error: the influence on a measured variable of the other conceptual  variables that are not part of the conceptual variable of interest o Systematic errors don’t cancel out over time and therefore are a threat to  construct validity  Reliability • Reliability: the extent to which a measure is free from random error o Best way to measure reliability is to test measures repeatedly  • Test­retest reliability: the extend to which scores on the same measured variable  correlate with each other on two different measurements given at two different  times o Correlation between scores should be r = 1.00 for test to be perfectly  reliable • Retesting effects: reactivity that occurs when the responses on the second  administration are influenced by respondents having been given the same or  similar measures before o Participants may answer same questions differently because they believe  experimenter wants different opinions or may get bored or may answer  exactly the same, all would effect the test­retest reliability • Equivalent­forms reliability: the extent to which scores on similar, but not  identical, measures administered at two different times, correlate with each other o Equivalent forms of tests may be administered to lower retesting effects Reliability as Internal Consistency • Traits: personality variables that are not expected to vary within people over time • States: personality variables that are expected to change within the same person  over short periods of time o Test­retest approach is not effective for measuring states because they are  known to change in a person  o Because of the problems with test­retest and equivalent­forms reliability,  internal consistency is more often used • Internal consistency: the extent to which the scores on the items of a scale  correlate with each other, usually assessed using coefficient alpha • True score: the part of a scale score that is not random error o Although some questions may contain a certain amount of random error,  they also contain parts that will assess the true score for the individual o Since random error is self cancelling, the random error components of the  items will not correlate with each other but the true score components will • Split­half reliability: a measure of internal consistency that involves correlating  the respondents’ scores on one half f the items with their scores on the other half  of the items o Thi
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 2360

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit