Textbook Notes (368,217)
Canada (161,710)
SOAN 2111 (44)
Chapter

Week 9.docx

5 Pages
91 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology and Anthropology
Course
SOAN 2111
Professor
Linda Hunter
Semester
Fall

Description
Course Reader – Adam Smith by Kimmel ­ Adam smith – Scottish economist and philosopher best known for The Wealth of Nations o The most influential economics books ever written o It set forth doctrines of liberal capitalism and the ideology of laissez­faire or minimal  government ­ His most original idea is that society, as much as the individual, is a system or machine, whose workings  are not the product of human intentions but the unconscious “invisible hand” ­ He wanted to place the moral teachings of Protestantism on a scientific footing o Out of this came Theory of Moral Sentiments   Book explains how each society evolves a moral consensus about what is proper, just and  prudent, which enables it to fuction as an “immense machine whose regular and  harmonious movements produce a thousand agreeable effects • Ex. Feelings that arise when one person imagines himself in the situation of  another  ▯moral sentiments  o Therefore smith asserts that wealth and morals go hand in hand ­ Leading Theme of Wealth of Nations o The value of goods is determined by the cost of their production, particularly the amount of labor  involved, and that to increase productivity labour must become specialized or divided o Natural price seems to diverge from the market price ▯ based on supply and demand   If market price is below natural price, the market price will rise  The Wealth of Nations I Of the Division of Labor ­ Greatest improvement in the productive powers of labour are the effects of the division of labor ­ People working together on different aspects of manufacturing ultimately are more productive when  compared to one man doing every aspect  o Subdivisions of labor  ­ The poor country notwithstanding the inferiority of its cultivation, can in some measure, rival the rich in  the cheapness and goodness of its corn, can pretend to no such competition in its manufactures; at least  if those manufactures suit the soil, climate and situation of the rich country ­ The great quantity of work is owing to three different circumstances o To the increase of dexterity in every particular workman  Increases the quantity of work he can perform o To the saving of the time which is commonly lost in passing from one species of work to another  One man works in the field while the other in the farmhouse, time is lost if you one man  moves from place to place  o To the invention of a great number of machines which facilitate and abridge labour and enable  one man to do the work of many   Men in each branch of labour will soon find easier and readier methods to get the job  done  ▯save their own labour through passing it onto machines  It is mainly people who take part in this labour that invent the machines to that it takes a  load off their backs  • ALL improve dexterity and saves time • Each person becomes more expert in his own peculiar branch, therefore creates  more work done upon the whole and quantity of science is increased by it  ­ Together with the tools of all the different workmen employed in producing those different  conveniences; if we examine, I say all these things and consider the co­operation of many thousands a  person who could afford the world would not provided these goods if there weren’t many people  contributing to the manufacturing of these goods II Of the Principal Which Gives Occasion to the Division of Labor ­ The division of labor is the necessary, though very slow and gradual consequence of a certain propensity  in human nature which has in view no such extensive utility; the propensity to tuck, barter, and exchange  one thing for another o Common to all men, and found in no other race of animals  o When an animal wants to obtain something of a man or another animals, it has no other means of  persuasion but to gain the favor of those whose service it requires  This is found in men also  We look out for our own self interest – bartering, treaty or purchase • We use those for their goods  ▯we are of use to our neighbours in the same way  that they are of use to us  ­ The difference of natural talents in different men is much less than we are aware of and the maturity is  not upon many occasions so much the cause as the effect of the division of labour o Difference of talents between people come when they are employed in different occupations o Men are not as different as they seem to be – a philosopher vs a street vendor    Different geniuses working together  for barter and exchange are of use to each other ,  one is not better than the other, just different in occupations • Their general disposition to truck barter and exchange, being brought into  common stock, where every man may purchase whatever part of the produce of  the other men’s talents he has occasion for McDonald Pg 89­105 Catherine Macaulay (1731­1791) ­ From enlightenment to the french revolution ­ She was a positive figure for the early American ‘s womens movement ­ Letters on Education o Major contribution to methodology o Prime example of integration of historical work and empiricist methodology o She held liberal political views such as support for the revolutions, proposals for nonsexist  education and refusal to glorify war   Help explain loss of her place in history o Authority and custom were sources of error  ▯logic was used to defend error  Zeitlin Chapter 4 Perfectibility through Education ­Rousseau’s Emile­ and Sophy ­education of women, the natural differences in sexes requires different education ­the mother’s role in child rearing is fundamental, since a child’s earliest education is most important  ­the nurse should be the mother and as the child grows and develops the father should be the teacher ­a child will be better educated by an ignorant father then the cleverest stranger ­freedom of movement allows a child to distinguish different types of pain, and helps to develop the innate  sense between justice and injustice ­two kinds of dependence; dependednce on things; work of nature, non­moral, does not injurity to liberty, and  dependence on men; the work of society, gives rise to every kind of vice ­the most important moral lesson of any lifetime; “never hurt anybody” ­Rosseau says that children’s taste for meat is unnatural, and their preference is natural foods; milk, fruits,  vegetables ­around puberty children transform sensations into ideas ­adolescents become more and more aware of their moral nature,
More Less

Related notes for SOAN 2111

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit