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SOAN 2112 (41)
Chapter 8

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Department
Sociology and Anthropology
Course
SOAN 2112
Professor
Linda Hunter
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 8: Saint-Simon (1960-1825) - sometimes been regarded as a founder of socialism - Marx called him “utopian socialist” – this meant Saint-Simon lived and wrote before industrial development had reached the critical point at which the ‘contradictions’ of capitalism had become clear – that is, before class conflict between the bourgeoisie and the proletariat had become a normal phenomenon - For the most part Saint-Simon was self-educated except for the help of some private tutors - He had fought with distinction in the American Revolution and had been among the first to advance a scheme for a canal to join the Atlantic with the Pacific - Scholars have now firmly established that Saint-Simon developed before 1814 all the major ideas which later theorists called their own o Positivism, industrialism, internationalism, a ‘new religion’ - Growth of science, emergence of an industrial and commercial bourgeoisie, the Protestant Revolution and the negative-critical philosophical movement of the Enlightenment, all served to undermine the Catholic Church and hence the unity of medieval society - The study of human conduct, which Saint-Simon called “social physiology”, must become a positive science in much the same way as the study of physical phenomena had become scientific - Science in the new order must fulfill the function of religion in the old order. How? By means of positivism, or the application of scientific principles to all natural and human phenomena - Religion would now be replaced by science - The class structure in short consists of the intellectuals, the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’ - The revolution occurred because the haves could no longer contain the movement, could no longer control the have-nots. o The reason for that was the loss of cultural and intellectual superiority on the part of the old elite consisting of monarch, priests, and nobles (essentially just saying science took over religion) - In his projection of the ‘new society’, Saint-Simon leaves the class structure, and hence, the institution of private property intact; the only change he advocates is the compensation of tenants
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