Textbook Notes (368,317)
Canada (161,798)
Sociology (1,112)
SOC 1500 (173)
Chapter

Crime and Criminology OCT 13TH.docx

4 Pages
50 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 1500
Professor
Mavis Morton
Semester
Fall

Description
Crime and Criminology October 13  2009  Emphasis on the individual ­ classical school ­ biological explanations  ▯psychological explanations ▯ sychological theory ­ personality disorders ­ learning theories  ▯ ocial learning theory  Theoretical Categories:  ­emphasis on individual  emphasis on social structure – TODAY  emphasis on social process emphasis on social conflict  Sociological Theories: Emphasis on Social Structure  ­ Social disorganization   ▯park and burgess – social ecology (Chicago School)  ▯shaw and McKay – cultural transmission (Chicago school)  ­ Strain theory  ▯merton – anomie  ▯Cohen – “middle class measuring rod”  ▯Cloward and Ohlin – differential opportunity Theory  Strain Theories ­ consensus model: a general consensus of shared norms and values exist in  society that some individuals and groups fail to adjust to ­ social structure and social learning influence the attitudes and behaviours of  the individual ­ examine social pathology rather than individual pathology [interested in looking at social structure (institutions and the way things are  organized) and social learning (the way people act) – no longer thinking that it is  the individual that is abnormal, now we believe that it is social pathology = what’s  happening in society is wrong ]  Strain theory: ­ crime is a result of social strain within society ­ strains are associated with:  a) “structural opportunities” – inadequate opportunities to achieve goals  (Opportunity Theory)  b) “cultural processes” – criminal behaviour is learned in social situations (Social  Learning Theory or Subcultural Theory)  [can be related to either structural component or cultural]  Response or solution to crime  1. enhance opportunities to reduce social strain (e.g. education, employment,  recreation opportunities)  2. resocialize into conventional goals and means (e.g. encourage interaction with  healthy peers)  [change structure of society because something is wrong with it] – resocialize  people  Emile Durkeim 20  century His analysis of society:  1. close relationship between social structure (the organzisation of society) e.g.  division of labour 2. norms and values of society (social and cultural life) e.g. collective conscience  shapes and regulates behaviour.  [relationships between social structure (who does what in a society in terms of  work), division of labour and the way societies were organized combined with  how norms and values regulate our behaviour. … idea about how we think about  things, norms and values have an effect of shaping and regulating how people  behave] Durkheim and Strain Theory ­ Durkheim established that crime is essentially a social phenomenon and  criminality is a product of a specific kind of social order  ­ A society without shared norms functions poorly  ▯  anomie (norm­less­ness) which leads to a breakdown in society and increases  suicide and crime [inability to regulate citizens]  [crime is normal and necessary – help distinguish and balance functional and  dysfunctional aspects… helps to identify what was functioning well and what  wasn’t – need for balance. ] Social Disorganization Social disorganization theories link crime to neighbourhood ecological characteristics.  ­ Park and Burgess – social ecology [worried about rapid social change in and  around Chicago – interested in looking at the way social changes were related to  crime (amount and how it was happening)  ­ Shaw and Mckay – cultural transmission  [ both adhere to social disorganization – both came out of the “Chicago school” .  Interested in explaining crime by looking at the environment/ ecology of their  communities or society.  Social Ecology – Park and Burgess [ recognizes that crime shows up unevenly distributed  in different geographical regions – characteristics of neighbourhoods that were different  they tried to identify them (what make them socially disorganized: amount of business  striving, how much social services were operating…] ­ Crime­ridden neighbourhoods – family, school, business, community, social  service agencies have broken down and no longer perform their expected  function ­ Residents exper
More Less

Related notes for SOC 1500

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit