Textbook Notes (368,552)
Canada (161,962)
Sociology (1,112)
SOC 1500 (173)
Chapter

Evaluating the Youth Criminal Justice Act after Five Years.docx

2 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 1500
Professor
Mavis Morton
Semester
Fall

Description
gEvaluating the Youth Criminal Justice Act after Five Years: A Qualified Success  ­ The most prominent objectives of the YCJA were to address the two major  concerns about the YOA: to reduce the use of courts and custody for the majority  of adolescent offenders and to improve the effectiveness of responses to the  relatively small number of young offenders convicted of serious crimes of  violence  ­ The YCJA represents an astute political compromise  ­ At the time that the YCJA was introduced, a prominently publicized aspect of the  act was the provisions intended “to respond more firmly and effectively to the  small number of the most serious, violent young offenders” in order to respond to  the “disturbing decline in public confidence in the youth justice” system ­ This article : reviews the first five years of implementation of the YJCA, with a  particular focus on issues related to diversion from court and the use of custody,  salient precisions of the act, especially those relating to diversion and sentencing,  and discusses recent Supreme Court of Canada decisions interpreting the YCJA  during its first five years in effect ­ The supreme court has affirmed the position that custody is to be used as last  resort for adolescent offenders and thereby contributed to the reduction in the use  of custody ­ The court has also emphasized that youth are to be treated differently from adults  and has ruled unconstitutional certain provisions of the YCJA that created a  presumption that youths found guilty of the most serious offences would receive  adult sentences Reducing use of courts and custody ­ most scholars agreed that the YOA provided little real guidance with respect to  the exercise of police discretion or the use of custody for juveniles  ­ community­based responses represent a cost­effective way to deal with juvenile  offenders, especially those who have committed less serious offences and who do  not have an extensive history of offending ­ even though there is generally a greater emphasis on rehabilitation in youth  custody facilities, imprisonment deprives adolescents of the social milieu on  which they depend for their moral and psychological development, and this may  increase the likelihood of school failure, a well­established contributor to juvenile  delinquency ­ while there is a need to imprison some adolescent offenders, the inappropriate use  of custody is expensive, ineffective and inhumane; imprisonment may contribute  to a cycle of juvenile re­offending  ­ early in this decade, the federal government set as a primary goal of its juvenile  justice reform a reduction in the number of juveniles being sentenced to  imprisonment ­ section 718.2(e) of the Criminal Code simply directed judges sentencing adults to  “take into consideration
More Less

Related notes for SOC 1500

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit