SOC 2700 Chapter Notes - Chapter 4: Sweet Little Sixteen, Falsetto, Roy Orbison

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MUSC*2150
Pg. 111-150
- The basic problem as some older hands saw it was that the wrong people
controlled rock and roll: musicians, disc jockeys and independent label owners
- Too much free choice resulted in too many unpredictable variables and the
entire enterprise fell apart
- For some the perspective outlined here explains why rock music was so
mediocre during these years corporate types tried to domesticate rock turning it
into a slick cynically produced commercial product that was a shadow of its
former self
- There was at least two distinct markets: one focused on the new generation of
teenagers (the younger siblings of first wave rock and roll fans) and another
directed at former rock and rollers
The Adults in the Room: Brill Building and Aldon Publishing
- The Bill Buildig is a atual plae ut Bill Buildig is also a stlisti lael ad
refers to a set of business practices
- Located in midtown Manhattan the building housed many of the most important
and established music publishers
- In many ways the Brill Building approach was a return to typical business
practices before rock and roll it returned power to the publishers and made the
performing artists more peripheral to the usi’s podutio
Teen Idols For Idle Teens
- The rise of Pat Boone and Elvis during the first wave established two distinct
tpes of tee idol: the good o- a clean cut and respectable young man middle
class parents would allow their daughter to date and the bad boy-a tough, sex
obsessed hoodlum whom parents tried hard to keep their girls away from
The Dae Caze, Aeia Badstad ad the tist
- The idea of American Bandstand was simple get a bunch of teenagers together in
the studio play current hit record as they dance and have a few musical guests
pefoig thei ost eet hits
- Bandstand was another instance of the migration of entertainment from radio to
Tv
- The show was essentially a rock and roll radio program adapted for television
Folk
- One of the key components of folk that attracted many listeners was its marked
populist character
- Folk seemed to be devoted to be a greater sense of community than commercial
pop: to its adherents, it was music for regular people, performed by regular
people
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- Folk performers were not perceived to be above their audience they were
thought to be in some sense representative of it
- Folk lyrics frequently told stories that illustrated various kinds of societal
problems and the meaning of the lyrics was much more important to folk
listeners than the musical prowess of the folk singer or his or her good look
- The rise of folk was preceded by a brief fascination with calypso music (Banana
boat) are the best examples of these easygoing soft-pop style featuring
Caribbean folk inflections that seemed exotic at the time
- Folk and Brill building pop are strikingly similar as they were intended two faces
of the same music business
- Both crafted to appeal to a distinct age group within young culture
- Pop was superficial and cute while folk was serious minded and intellectually
engaging
(Second half)
131-150
Phil Spector and the Wall of Sound:
-Was the most ambitious producer of the early 1960s and the most important producer
of girl-group pop
-Spector began to work under Leiber and Stoller, helping at sessions and learning how to
produce records
-Spector demanded total control of the recording process
-He deeloped a appoah to podutio that he alled Wall of “oud
-Most groups have a distinct sonic identity, often resulting from the singing voices
involved
-For Spector, the production was the star of the record, not the group
-He often recorded and enormous number of instruments in a relatively small space
-Several guitars, pianos, basses and drum sets could be crammed into one room at Gold
Star Studios in Los Angeles
-The sound from one instrument would spill into the microphone of the next, and all of
this would be mixed together into a monophonic backing track
-“peto’s aageets supported this wash of sound by including interesting cases of
doulig: a tehiue that euies to o oe istuets to pla the sae otes,
creating a novel combination of instrumental color
-Spector relied on heavy amounts of reverb to thicken up the eod’s soud ad
blend the instruments and voices
-The idea as fo a sigle soi taste to eege that ould ot easil e oke do
into its component parts
-Vocals were layered over this mono backing track, with strings added to finish it off
-The recording was done on a three-track machine that allowed each track to be
recorded separately
-The usual procedure was to record the guitars, basses, pianos, and percussion on the
first track, all the vocals on the second track, and add the string on the third track
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Document Summary

The basic problem as some older hands saw it was that the wrong people controlled rock and roll: musicians, disc jockeys and independent label owners. Too much free choice resulted in too many unpredictable variables and the entire enterprise fell apart. There was at least two distinct markets: one focused on the new generation of teenagers (the younger siblings of first wave rock and roll fans) and another directed at former rock and rollers. The adults in the room: brill building and aldon publishing. The b(cid:396)ill buildi(cid:374)g is a(cid:374) a(cid:272)tual pla(cid:272)e (cid:271)ut (cid:862)b(cid:396)ill buildi(cid:374)g(cid:863) is also a st(cid:455)listi(cid:272) la(cid:271)el a(cid:374)d refers to a set of business practices. Located in midtown manhattan the building housed many of the most important and established music publishers. In many ways the brill building approach was a return to typical business practices before rock and roll it returned power to the publishers and made the performing artists more peripheral to the (cid:373)usi(cid:272)"s p(cid:396)odu(cid:272)tio(cid:374)

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