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Chapter Final

HIST113 Chapter Notes - Chapter Final: Dried And Salted Cod, Teck Resources, Overfishing


Department
History
Course Code
HIST113
Professor
Catherine Briggs
Chapter
Final

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PART A - ARTICLE QUESTIONS
-How the article might conflict with course content (brings up facts in different ways, argues differently)
Article Thesis Main Points Theme Connection to
course Key events and
people
Creating a New Staple:
Capital, Technology, and
Monopoly in B.Cs Resource
Sector
∙ -The mining industry
drastically changed after
the emergence of zinc as
the industry was
restructured and new
technology was created to
extract minerals other
than gold and silver to
make a profit
-(The mining industry
drastically changed after
the emergence of zinc)
-Hallmark of the new industry
was technology, economies of
scale, and substantial capital
investment
∙ -Cominco was able to put in
place the necessary technology
to tap its enormous lead-zinc
deposit at Kimberly, and
successfully treat zinc at its
Trail refinery
-Became the most profitable
mining company to ever
operate in BC
-Have the capital, technology,
and backing from the
government
-∙ -Problem: inability of
traditional smelting methods to
treat low-grade silver-lead-zinc
ores efficiently.
-Andrew Gordon French had a
new way of extracting zinc:
Létrange process (a three stage
procedure involving roasting
zinc ore, leaching it in solution
and then recovering the
metallic zinc by electrolysis)
-COMINCO was given
exclusive rights to this process
∙ -Cominco was able to pioneer
the necessary treatment process
for zinc, and thereby guarantee
its success, largely because of
its size and the financial
resources provided by its
relationship with the CPR (the
government gave large capital
investments)
-Expansion
-Role of Technology*
-Big business
-Government
intervention*
-Ongoing importance
of resources (staples)
-Finally able to
mine a lot of
canadas
resources
because of new
improvements in
machinery and
science
-Zinc was used in
munitions
(ties into the war
and governments
involvement)
-Technology and
infrastructure
was improved
made the
industry grow,
and more money
for Canada
-Nickel and Zinc
did not have a
purpose
originally
-COMINCO was
a subsidiary of
the CPR
-COMINCO
-Andrew Gordon
French
-->Létrange process
The Managerial Revolution
and the Hudsons Bay
Company Department Stores
-Explains from a
traditional business
history framework the
company’s prolonged
inability to create a
profitable chain of
department stores in
Western Canada
∙ -The company’s failure
seems to have stemmed
from its excessive
reliance upon scientific
management formulas
and organizational
theories
∙ -It was only during the
-Were not meeting needs of the
community
-Implementations strategies
∙ -The Bay’s lack of success
derived from its excessive
attachment to new theories and
innovations
∙ -FI'llposts were turned into
department stores with little
regard either to future
marketing potential or to basic
techniques of large scale
distribution
∙ -Decentralized buying and
disorganized pricing, as each
store manager was given the
liberty to establish his own
trading margins
-Big Business*
-Retail sector*
-Scientific
management
-Once you
centralize buying
you are able to
get bulk
discounts and
beat out the
smaller stores
-Eaton centre
employed similar
strategies and
were able to
prosper early on
(catalogues- less
capital)
-Consumers
could choose
what they wanted
-Hudson’s Bay
Company
-Scientific methods
-->Turnover/margins

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depression that the Bay
was able to recoup its
losses by moving away
from the professional
orthodoxies of the
twenties, returning to
older business structures,
and deciding on a more
consumer oriented
approach
∙ -Price deflation during the
depression sparked a crisis in
the decentralized HBC
hierarchy
∙ -Turnover selling was an
inappropriate method for the
company to employ
∙ -Low pricing cheapened the
image of the company, led to
ruthless internal cost-cutting
which affected service, and
ultimately produced destructive
price wars.
From Independence to
Integration: The Corporate
Evolution of the Ford Motor
Company of Canada
The unique emergence
and transformation of
ford Canada among ford’s
foreign enterprises is
explained by Canada’s
changing automotive
trade policies, the
personal relations of the
ford family with its
Canadian offspring, and a
corporate strategy
pursued by Henry Ford’s
successors and the
American ford company
which sought to bring
Ford-Canada more
directly under Detroit’s
control.
-By building a ford company in
Canada it was able to access
imperial (British) and Canadian
markets
-High tariffs in Canada (35%)
∙ -Canada's proximity to Detroit
was essential in making
Canadian consumers among the
earliest adopters of the
automobile and led directly to
the growth of the Canadian
industry, which quickly became
one of the largest in the world.
-Timing was important: if
McGregor had waited, then
Henry Ford probably would
have brought it to Canada
himself
∙ -The two governments and the
industry came to a compromise:
the Canadians succeeded in
having local content,
investment, and output targets
built into the agreement that
guaranteed certain levels of
Canadian production in the
North American market.
∙ -Auto Pact: The new
arrangement allowed
companies based in Canada or
the United States (essentially
the Big Three and their
Canadian subsidiaries) to
import parts and autos duty
free, as long as they maintained
a minimum 50 percent North
American content (for the
United States), or achieved
minimum Canadian production
targets and continued to build
as many cars and trucks in
Canada as they had before
1965.
-Big Business
∙ -Connection to foreign
companies/models/inv
estment**
∙ -Role of technology
-Role of government
-Foreign
investment in the
Canadian Auto
Industry was
beneficial to
Canada
-Represents the
everchanging
multinational
enterprise
-America gave
Canada the
technology and
methods needed
to expand our
automotive
industry (helped
to boost our
economy)
-Ford Canada
-Gordon McGregor
-Auto pact
Why did the Bank of Canada
emerge in 1935? The article presents three
hypotheses for the reason
The following summarizes the
three core political reasons why
-Business and The
State In WWII, the
Banks were in -Bank of Canada
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