INTST101 Chapter Notes - Chapter 4: Moral Authority, Dominican Republic–Central America Free Trade Agreement, World Intellectual Property Organization

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Global, Local and Glocal
Glocalization: ability of certain nations to absorb foreign ideas and global best practices
POLITICAL GLOBALIZATION
What, in your view, is ‘political globalization?’:
refers to global governance; nation-state’s politics influenced by multiple actors: international political organisations
(UN, EU, IMG, WTO,WB), NGOs, grass-root movements
What is the difference between international and global studies?:
International Studies: interpretation of major global trends in a multidisciplinary manner > look at the world from many
different areas > describes global economy or considers how films reflect new trends in cultural globalization > emphasis on
language competence and various dimensions of globalization
Global studies: doesn’t focus on the nation-state but on the transnational processes and issues that are key to
globalization > programs stress importance of race, class, and gender and social responsibility in international affairs
> Both studies share a commitment to interdisciplinary work -- focus on globalization and change, and an emphasis
on how global trends impact humanity and both focus on global citizenship
> Both differ from international relations: an older discipline within political science that emphasizes ties between
nations and topics with clear importance to nation-states, such as war, economics, and diplomacy
What is the difference between government & governance?:
Government: a body that comprises a person or a group of persons who run the administration of a country; means
in which power is exercised
Governance: refers to the activities of a government > rules and laws made by the government that are sought to be
implemented through a chosen bureaucracy
> Global Governance: authority, cooperation or management of public/private/formal/informal nature
lead to common goals
-encompasses many institutions and practices set of states and mainly international organization and
individual (non-governmentally) organization
Using a minimum of two examples, how do global civil organization differ from traditional international
organizations and multinational corporations?:
Global Civil Organizations:
- non-state, not-for-profit, voluntary organizations formed by people in that social sphere;
not operated by the government, often reliant on donations, and comprised of volunteers
- all civic groups are NGOs: seek to influence the policy of governments and international organizations
and/or to complement government services (such as health and education)
- operate on small/local basis or nationally, or internationally, > e.g: Save the Children, MSF, WHO
Traditional International Organization:
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-a body that promotes voluntary cooperation and coordination between or among its members
- closely associated with the term 'international organization' > organizations made up primarily of sovereign
states (member states)
EX: UN, WTO, EU, IMF
> Within the EU in particular, we see how mobility of capital, ideas, and power have all occurred.
A multinational Corporation:
- usually a large corporation which produces/sells goods/services around particular commodities—oil,
coffee, tea, bananas in various countries
- not gov. officials who play key negotiating roles but rather business and labor representatives who make
decisions
- work with both economic and political dimensions of globalization
Importing and exporting goods and services
Making significant investments in a foreign country
Buying and selling licenses in foreign markets
Engaging in contract manufacturing—permitting a local manufacturer in a foreign country to produce their
products
1) The League of Nations (ideas informing it and why did not last):
- Woodrow Wilson (American President): founder of liberalism and advocated for the inception of
organizations and international law to prevent/resolve war/conflict and advocated for Allies (France &
England) to relinquish their colonies
> resulted in the 1st part of Treaty of Versailles > officially ended the war in 1919 > formed the League of
Nations and the Permanent Court of International Justice in 1920’s > without US membership and
participation, inability for Germany to join, League failed to prevent Japanese invasion of Manchuira (1931),
Italian Invasion of Ethiopia (1935) and German rearmament and European interregnum (suspension of
normal gov.)
2) The UN Systems (the ideas informing it, structure, strengths and weaknesses)
i. The UN Security Council (purpose, structure, Performance)
- 15 members, addresses critical issues and 5 permanent members with veto powers: China, France, Great
Britain, Soviet Union and US
ii. UN General Assembly
- charged with making recommendations to the Security Council, writes reports and approves the budget but
doesn’t address key issues of peace and security
-clearly not democratic, but participation of Great Powers was contingent on their status supremacy
Failures:
- didn’t prevent Rwanda or Bosnia genocide and other violent conflicts
- inability to enforce its decision; clearly not democratic, but participation of Great Powers was contingent on their
status supremacy
-holds reputation for being corrupt, bureaucratic and ineffective
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