Textbook Notes (368,665)
Canada (162,054)
Philosophy (42)
PHIL 327 (3)
Chapter

Section 1: Philosophy and the Law

5 Pages
122 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHIL 327
Professor
Stephanie Gregoire
Semester
Winter

Description
SECTION 1 PHILOSOPHY AND THE LAW (p. 1­14) Sources of Law ­ Legislative law – sometimes called statutory law, consists of the enactments of an  elected, legislative body o Ordinance – another form of written, legislative law, usually referring to  the laws passed by a local government body such as a city council or  board of supervisors o Statutes and ordinances remain in force until either repealed or ruled  unconstitutional  ­ Judicial law – derives from the process of adjudication, where courts apply  statutes, ordinances, or constitutional provisions to the facts of a particular case;  interpretation on the application of written law to various circumstances  o Judge­made laws are sometimes called case law or common law o Central element of case law – stare decisis – the process of following the  points of law established by other courts in earlier cases (precedent) ­ Constitutional law – hybrid of legislative and judicial law – a written constitution  which sets out the basic structure of the national government o Amendments – dealing with procedural matters and fundamental rights o Like legislative law because of the written document, like judicial law  because of the interpretation and appliance o Linking adjudication + legislation: courts power to invalidate legislative  enactments that violate provisions of the state/federal constitution (judicial  review) ­ Administrative law – comprises of all the regulations, standards, and decisions  that derive from the many administrative agencies created by Congress and the  executive branch o Agencies were created to regulate certain areas of social life o Agencies have the authority to issue regulations that have the force of law Substantive Law ­ Regardless of source, law can be sorted into one of two types: substantive or  procedural ­ Principals of substantive law – dealing with actual rights and wrongs of life o Civil law – regarding private disputes between parties over property,  business transactions, accidents and injuries, etc (private refers to an entity  separate form gov’t)  Tort law – personal injury lawsuits o Criminal law – concerning wrongs against the state, rather than private  party; violating rules by which we all agreed to abide Procedural Law ­ Regulates the process of resolving a civil lawsuit or criminal case (“legal referee”) ­ Regulations vary in every state on how an initial complaint in a lawsuit is filed,  how pretrial motions and fact­finding are to be conducted, how evidence is to be  gathered, shared, and then presented at trial, and how appeals are to be handles ­ Official proceedings in typical civil cases o Pleadings – documents filed by plaintiff, complaint + by defendant,  responding o Process of discovery – evidence is gathered, depositions, request for  documents o Pretrial hearing – judge determining parties’ preparation for trial o Jury selection  ▯trial  ▯verdict ­ Procedure for criminal cases o Preliminary hearing – examining the basis for the charges (can be waived  by accused)  Judge decides if sufficient evidence against defendant for trial, yes  = indictment o Arraignment – defendant enters a plea to the charges in the indictment  3 pleas available – not guilty; guilty; “nolo contendere/”I do not  contest”  Nolo contendere is basically a guilty plea, without admitting  culpability ­ In civil + criminal – losing party has the right to appeal a verdict to a court of  appeal ­ Procedural law also sets out roles and functions of the various participants  involved in a court proceeding – judges, lawyers, juries ­ Adversarial system – based on the concept of justice that assumes the truth is  most effectively discovered and justice best obtained by trials  Philosophy and Ethics ­ Resolving philosophical questions about knowledge, reality, and right and wrong ­ Metaphysics – the study of the basic nature of reality o Fundamental part of the picture of the world – persons exist as agents who  can act and cause changes to occur, for which they can then be held  responsible o The law traditionally holds people accountable for their acts, not  omissions ­ Epistemology – the theory of knowledge o Malice forethought – refers to the state of mind at the time ­ Ethics/Moral philosophy – reflection upon the values and standards that shape our  lives and guide our actions – reviewing these questions carefully constitute task of  philosophical ethics Utilitarianism and the Greater Good ­ Philosophically, the morally right act is that which will produce the best  consequences for all affected (consequentialist thinking) ­ Utilitarianism theory o Philosophers – Jeremy Bentham (1748­1832) and John Stuart Mill (1806­ 1873) o Bentham regarded utilitarianism as an important tool for social and legal  reform for legislation, and saw the CJS as excessively brutal and outdated o Principle of Utility – always act so as to bring about the greatest net good  for all of those affected by your actions  Not all agree on what “good” and “bad” mean, and what is to be  maximized o Bentham and Mill believed the final analysis reduced to pain and pleasure  (hedonism) o Hedonism – holds that pleasure and the avoidance of pain is the only thing  of intrinsic value or worth; the only thing worth having just for what it is o Preference utilitarianism – asks us to take account of the  preference/interests of all of those affects by our conduct; the goal is then  to bring about the greatest net satisfaction of preferences o The PU does not so much apply to individual actions a
More Less

Related notes for PHIL 327

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit