Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
Sociology (245)
SOC 101 (156)
Chapter 1

Chapter 1.docx

7 Pages
56 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 101
Professor
Barry Mc Clinchey
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 1: Sociological Theory • Antonio Gramsci believed everyone is a social theorist • Our day­to­day actions are part of making/remaking of the actual world we live in • Want to understand the taken­for­granted nature of social life▯ naturalistic • Our thinking itself has become something we accept as natural • We are born into an existing society of things and people • Born into a world of ideas of what we should and shouldn’t think or do • Identity is formed by other people •  C. Wright Mills ­­>key to understanding is ability to connect personal problems with larger forces  in society • Concerned with why society operates so imperfectly • Binary: use of either/or concepts (eg. good/evil, body/mind) in social theory • one of the most important binary distinctions▯ structure/agency ­we are born into pre­existing social arrangements or structures ­on the other hand, we choose one course of actions over others ­people are thinking and acting▯exercise agency • social theory focuses its attention on the working of those pre­existing structures and institutions  that set the limits and boundaries of our lives • new ideas come into a world dominated by old ideas (new/old) Birth of Sociology in the Age of Revolution • European social theorists created binary concept simultaneously with application of the world  ‘modern’ (traditional/modern) • Key difference separating traditional and modern▯the way people understood and thought about  the world • Modern society: age of Enlightenment • Enlightenment: era in the 1700s when theorists believed human reason could be the instrument  of perfecting social life; emotions had to be controlled; role of religion, custom, and authority was  criticized •  Auguste Comte i▯ nvented the term’sociology’ ­intended a ‘science’ of society that allows us to understand social life Chapter 1: Sociological Theory ­saw there was a 3 stage ‘law’ that social thinking passed through ­first stage ▯world was run by supernatural powers (gods) ­second stagep▯ hilosophy, the idea of ‘nature’, world proceeds on its natural way ­third (positive) sta▯ pplication of scientific laws of nature to change the physical world to suit  themselves ­this knowledge would give us power over social change • Positivisma▯ ssumption that human society can be studied objectively, as in natural science, and  that social laws can be discovered to understand how society works •  Herbert Spencer▯ elieved society was a struggle for existence, ‘survival of the fittest’ Classical Sociology • Questions sociologists are interested in don’t have a rational basis • Social theorists try to understand people’s intentions; analyzing using thinking and choosing •  Max Weber p▯ eople act on the basis of what they believe and intend • Subjective ▯opposite of objective; refers to observer’s mind, perceptions, intentions and  interpretations etc. that affect how we act in the world ­ex. We believe laws are right and for the common good, we obey  if we believe law only represents rich and powerful, we might disobey • Society basically stays the same over time, and it is constantly changing • Functionalist theorists seek to identify the basic functions that must be fulfilled in all societies  and understand how they are accomplished • Functiont▯ he role played by a part of society or a social institution , usually in terms of the  importance of the role in maintaining social order and stability  • Functionalism ▯if something exists in society and persists over time, it must perform some  necessary function that is important for the reproduction of society • Sociology seeks to understand social continuity▯ ow society is  reproduced •  Marx▯ urpose of social theory is not to understand the world but to change it • Conflict perspectivec▯ hange comes from conflict (between gov’t and people, rich and poor etc.) Emile Durkheim • Life­long study of relationship between individual and society Chapter 1: Sociological Theory • Thought modern society lost the shared code of morality; no longer shared a collective  conscience • Simplest societies held together by practices like religious celebrations and gift­giving nd • 2  source of togetherness: regular scared gatherings ­experienced ‘collective effervescence’ that bound them together ­generated a feeling of spirituality▯feeling greater than themselves • Feeling of spirituality is the root of religious belief▯originated from shared social experience, not  from supernatural • Sacred part of life overshadowed by secular (ex. Gift giving) •  Jean Baudrillar▯ odern individualism expressed by participation in rites of mass consumption ­things take on an almost sacred aura • Felt power of religion to uphold a system of moral rules had diminished • Anomie: condition of modern society in which there are too few moral rules and regulations to  guide people’s conduct • Traditional institution (marriage and family) breaking down • Men had inborn sexual passion that had to be curbed and be regulated by marriage  • Otherwise, their sexual desires would lead them to pursuit of novelty and excess • People becoming more individualized as modern society evolved from spirit of community • Individualism: positive as it promoted respect for human rights ­however, undermines people’s connections to society • Overcoming anomie▯ new moral code for society ­people educated to respect each person’s individuality ­each individual should understand that his/her welfare depends on everyone else: organic  solidarity • Feeling closely connected to society is essential for the well­being of an individual • Examination of suiciden▯ ot entirely a lonely act ­Victor Hommay: felt isolated, had few ties to other people, sees no reason to live ­key to suicide: strength or weakness of individuals’ ties to their community and society ­self­destruction: social fact can be understood scientifically and objectively • Durkheim’s social theory▯examining society as a totality of inter­connected parts Chapter 1: Sociological Theory Karl Marx • Understanding the origins of contemporary society and the forces leading to change within it • Analyzing any society▯examine its economic system • Early societies▯simple hunting, gathering modes; people close to being social equals • Surplus: part of the value of goods produced by working people that is taken by the dominant  class and used to maintain social inequalities; a measure of exploitation of
More Less

Related notes for SOC 101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit