Textbook Notes (368,629)
Canada (162,027)
Sociology (245)
SOC 222 (15)
Chapter 6

Chapter 6 - Strain Theory.docx

4 Pages
82 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 222
Professor
Owen Gallupe
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 6: Strain Theory  • As per Strain Theory, when juveniles experience strain or stress, they become  upset and engage in delinquency: ◦ Engage in violence to end harassment from peers ◦ Steal to reduce money problems ◦ Runa way from home to escape abusive parents ◦ Illicit drug use to feel better ◦ Delinquent acts to seek revenge against those who have wronged • Young people are exposed to sever and persistent strains making a delinquent  response even more likely • Many violent acts start off with one person insulting another or doing something  the other person does not like • Modern version of Strain theory ­ Robert K. Merton in 1938 ◦ Inability of individuals to achieve culturally prescribed success goals ◦ Everyone should strive for monetary success and upward social mobility  but lower class lack legitimate means to do so ◦ When success goals are blocked, people become frustrated and resort to  illegitimate paths to monetary success like drug dealing, theft etc. ◦ Merton developed the theory in reaction to pathological theories ­ crime  due to abnormal psychological or biological characteristics ◦ Strain theory advances the view that otherwise ordinary people can be  pressured into crime or delinquency by difficult or frustrating  circumstances Delinquent responses to strain are psychologically understandable and predictable • Strain theory: ◦ Describes the major types of strain that lead to delinquency; ◦ Describe the conditions under which strain is most likely to lead to  delinquency • Strain usually does not lead to delinquency ­ only under certain conditions ◦ Conditioning variables influence likelihood What are the Major Types of Strain? The Failure to Achieve Your Goals Money • Some theorists argue that money is the central goal • Poor and rich are encouraged to work hard to make a lot of money • Necessary to buy necessities of life and luxuries • Many adolescents are unable to obtain money legally ­ experience strain and sell  drugs, do theft, prostitution etc. • Criminals and delinquents engage in income­generating crime because they want  money but cannot easily get it • Desperate need for money ­ crimes the only way ◦ Their needs ­ partying, gambling, drugs • Many individuals with monetary strain do not engage in crime • IF monetary strain is a cause of delinquency, criminologists must demonstrate that  people high in monetary strain are more likely to engage in delinquency than  people low in such strain • Limited support that monetary strain is related to delinquency Status/Respect • People want to be treated in a fair/just manner • Anger is often a result of disrespectful or unjust treatment • Desire for masculine status is very relevant in delinquency • Class and race differences about being a "man" ◦ Independence, dominance, toughness, competitive ◦ Difficulty being treated as a man due to school system on docility and  submission • Juveniles attempt to accomplish masculinity through delinquency to show  toughness, dominance and independence  • Concern with one's manhood or status may be more for African American males  and lower­class males as a result of discrimination and limited opportunities Thrills/Excitement • Engage in thrilling or editing activities ­ sensation seekers • Children in school are prevented from engaging in risky behaviours by adults  during the day and want to be aggressive, do drugs and steal after school Autonomy from adults • Freedom from control of others • Adults often deny the autonomy teens desire and though they have more  autonomy than children, they behaviour is still under control. 1 School has many regulations and authoritarian styles of teaching 2 Parents deny autonomy • Delinquency is a means of asserting, achieving autonomy or venting frustration  against those who
More Less

Related notes for SOC 222

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit