FMST 210 - Questions for Reading #2 (Sandnabba & Ahlberg, 1..
FMST 210 - Questions for Reading #2 (Sandnabba & Ahlberg, 1999).docx

3 Pages
226 Views
Unlock Document

School
University of British Columbia
Department
Family Studies
Course
FMST 210
Professor
Maria Weatherby
Semester
Winter

Description
Parents’ Attitudes and Expectations About Children’s Cross­Gender Behaviour Sandnabba & Ahlberg (1999) Introduction 1. What evidence suggests that gender role socialization begins at the time of an infant’s birth? Most parents are extremely interested in learning whether their newborn infant is a boy or a girl, and  intentionally or not, this knowledge elicits in them a set of expectations consistent with beliefs about gender­ role­appropriate traits. 2. Are concerns about cross­gender behaviour dependent upon the sex of the child? Explain your  reasoning. Yes. Studies have shown that boys who engage in traditionally feminine activities are viewed more  negatively than girls who engage in masculine activities. 3. According to Martin (1990), are American women more or less accepting of children’s cross­gender  behaviour than American men? More accepting 4. Three explanations that account for the differential evaluations of cross­gender behaviour in boys  and girls are described in the current study. (a) Describe the first explanation and explain how it can account for the differential evaluations of  cross­gender behaviour in boys and girls. It concerns the different status levels associated with masculine and feminine roles. According to Feinman, a  female’s movement into the more highly valued male role is more acceptable than a male’s movement  toward the less valued female role. (b) Describe the second explanation and explain how it can account for the differential evaluations  of cross­gender behaviour in boys and girls. It involves expectations about the child’s future. Differing evaluations are due to the belief that girls, but not  boys, will ``grow out’’ of their cross­gender behavior; in other words, boys are predicted to continue to show  cross­gender behavior into adulthood. (c) Describe the third explanation and explain how it can account for the differential evaluations of  cross­gender behaviour in boys and girls. Parents fear that feminine boys will grow up to be either gay or transsexual. Martin (1990) found that  concerns about future outcomes account for more negative attitudes toward cross­gender boys. Anthill  (1987) found that parents believe that cross­gender play in boys, more than in girls, is an indicator of later  same­gender sexual behavior. 5. The current study attempts to replicate Martin’s (1990) earlier study. However, the participants in  the current study are different from the participants in Martin’s (1990) study. Explain the  difference. Martin used college students while this study examined Finnish parents. This means that the people who  rated their perceptions of children’s gender roles had children of their own. Method 6. The researchers state that the qualitative or demographic characteristics of the participants  “closely resembled those of the population of the city of Turku, Finland, in general” (p. 251).  Identify ONE source of sampling bias that would prevent the researchers from generalizing their  results to all parents of five­year­olds in Turku, Finland. Non random selection 7. What research method is the current study utilizing? Explain your reasoning. A survey; which were distributed by health care personnel to parents to complete at home. Results General Acceptability in Society: 8. Did the data demonstrate that the sex of the child was a significant factor in parents’ perception of  societal acceptance of cross­gender behaviour? If so, explain. Yes, Girls who were labeled “boyish’’ were rated as being much more acceptable in our society than boys  labeled as “girlish’’. 9. Who perceived cross­gender behaviour in boys as more socially acceptable (mothers or fathers)? Fathers 10. Who perceived cross­gender b
More Less

Related notes for FMST 210

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit