Textbook Notes (368,330)
Canada (161,803)
KIN 190 (4)
All (2)
Chapter 10

Kin 190 chapter 10 notes.docx part 2

3 Pages
252 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology
Course
KIN 190
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Fall

Description
Mechanisms of muscle contraction and fatigue 1. describe the steps in the contraction cycle 2. explain how ATP is produced in muscle 3. describe the possible mechanisms of muscle fatigue  contraction cycle 1. ATP hydrolysis a. Myosin head include an ATP­binding site and an ATPase, an enzyme that  hydrolyzes ATP into ADP (adenosine diphosphate) and a phosphate group.  This hydrolysis reaction reorients and energizes the myosin head. Notice  that the products of ATP hydrolysis­ADP and a phosphate group­are still  attached to the myosin head.  2. attachment of myosin to actin to form cross­bridges a. The energized myosin head attaches to the myosin­binding site on actin  and releases the previously hydrolyzed phosphate group. When the myosin  heads attach to the actin during contraction, they are referred to as cross­ bridges.  3. power stroke a. After the cross­bridges form, the power stroke occurs. During the power  stroke, the site on the cross­bridge where ADP is still bound opens. As a  result the cross­bridge rotates and releases ADP. The cross­bridge  generates force as it rotates toward the center of the sarcomere, sliding the  thin filament past the thick filaments toward the M line.  4. detachment of myosin from actin a. At the end of the power stroke, the cross­bridge remains firmly attached to  actin until it binds another molecule of ATP. As ATP binds to the ATP­ binding site on the myosin head, the myosin head detaches from actin.  Production of ATP in muscle fibers: • Unlike most of the other cells in the body, skeletal muscle cells often switch from  a low level of activity to a high level of activity. • The amount of ATP present in the muscle cell itself is only enough to power  contraction for a few seconds. Therefore the muscle cell must make ATP itself.  • Muscle fibers have 3 ways of producing ATP: from creatine phosphate, anaerobic  respiration and aerobic respiration. o Creatine phosphate: while muscle cells are relaxed they produce more than  the necessary amount of ATP. Most of the excess ATP is used to synthesize  creatine phosphate, an energy rich molecule that is found in muscle fibers.  The enzyme creatine kinase (CK) catalyzes the transfer of one the high­ energy phosphate groups from ATP to creatine, forming creatine phosphate  and ADP. Creatine is a small, amino acid­like molecule that is synthesized  in the liver, kidneys, and pancreas and then transported to the muscle cells.  CK is 3­6x more plentiful than ATP in the sarcoplasm of a relaxed fiber.  When contraction begins and the ADP level starts to rise, CK catalyzes the  transfer of a high­energy phosphate group from creatine phosphate back to  ADP. This direct phosphorylation reaction quickly generates new ATP  molecules. Since the formation of ATP from creatine phosphate occurs  very rapidly, creatine phosphate is the first source of energy when muscle  contraction begins. All together the stores of creatine phosphate and ATP  provide enough energy for muscles to contract maximally for about 15  seconds.  o Anaerobic Cellular Respiration: series of ATP­producing reactions that for  not require oxygen. When muscle activity continues and the supply of  creatine phosphate is depleted, glucose is catabolized to gene
More Less

Related notes for KIN 190

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit