Textbook Notes (368,074)
Canada (161,621)
KIN 261 (8)
All (2)
Chapter

Week 1 – The Biomedical and Social Models of Health.docx

8 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology
Course
KIN 261
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Spring

Description
Week 1 – The Biomedical and Social Models of Health 03/11/2014 Objective: define, explain and critique the biomedical model of health and the social model of health  Biomedical Definition of Health Health is the … Focus on biology and biological explanations (for health and illness) Health/illness would be thought of as something that is …physically situated and experienced (in the body)  The conventional approach to medicine in Western societies, based on the diagnosis and explanation of  illness as a malfunction of the body’s biological mechanisms. This approach underpins most health  services, which focus on treating individuals, and generally ignores the social origins of illness and its  prevention.  Biomedical Model of Disease Causation “Disease is an objectively measurable pathology of the physical body, which is the result of malfunctioning  parts of the body. Cure is through chemotherapeutic, surgical, [behavior modification through lifestyle  change], or other ‘heroic’ means. Hospitals, as places for the practice of high­tech medicine, are of primary  importance” (Clarke, 2008, p. 292). Biomedical Model of Health ­ Five Defining Characteristics: Cartesian mind/body dualism Machine metaphor Technological imperative Physical reductionism Doctrine of specific etiology Cartesian Mind/Body Dualism 17  century French philosopher Rene Descartes  “I think, therefore I am.”  (“Cogito ergo sum.”) Although the mind and body interacted with each one another, they were separate entities.  In Christian doctrine, this meant the soul could go to heaven while the body stayed behind Health interventions focus on the body (not the person as a whole) Technology enables health practitioners to assess bodily functioning without the conscious awareness or  involvement of the individual (stethoscopes, ultrasounds, autopsies) The practitioner does not need to communicate with the person; they can just examine their body for a  diagnosis.  The mind (or mental state of a person)  onsidered unimportant   Machine Metaphor Body viewed as a machine made up of a series of discrete parts (organs, bones) Disease and illness = “breakdown” of the body Health practitioners work to “repair” the body to restore it to health Technological Imperative Treatment is primarily through pharmacological or surgical interventions Emphasis on the curative nature of medicine (rather than on lifestyle, etc… ) Physical Reductionism Reduction of all symptoms to “the physical workings of the body” (Barry and Yuill, 2008, p. 25) No attention to social, psychological, environmental etc. factors Everything is reduced to the physical body  Example: eating organic food (with pesticides ­▯ leads to disease ▯ body is treated ▯ pesticide use is not  halted or reduced  Doctrine of Specific Etiology Disease is assumed to originate “from specific and knowable causes”  (Barry and Yuill, 2008, p. 26) For example:  a germ, virus, or micro­organism OR a trauma (accident) Leads to the search for a “magic bullet” (medication, surgery, or other treatment) to restore the body to  health  How to Cure Illness/Disease (according to the Biomedical Model of Health)  Surgery, pharmaceuticals and other medical treatments  Behavior modification (non­smoking, exercise, diet, etc.…) Health education and immunization (Germov & Hornosty, 2012, p. 13) Criticisms of the Biomedical Model of Health **From within medicine as well as from other disciplines** The Fallacy of the Specific Etiology The idea of a specific cause for a specific disease, referred to as a specific etiology, applies only to a limited  range of infectious diseases. Most diseases are the indirect outcome of a constellation of circumstances  rather than the direct result of single determinant factors. Not all people exposed to an infectious disease  contract it. Disease causation is more complex than the biomedical model implies and is likely to involve  multiple factors such as physical condition, nutrition and stress, which affect an individual’s susceptibility to  illness.  Objectification and Medical Scientism Since the basis of the model is mind/ body dualism and a focus on repairing the ‘broken’ parts of the  machine­like body, can lead to the objectification of patients. Patients may become objectified as ‘diseased  bodies’ or ‘cases’ rather than treated as unique individuals with particular needs. Patient’s thoughts,  feelings, and subjective experiences of illness are considered ‘unscientific’ and are mostly dismissed.  Reductionism and Biological Determinism By reducing its focus on disease to the biological, cellular, and genetic levels, medicine has ignored or  downplayed the social and psychologi
More Less

Related notes for KIN 261

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit