Textbook Notes (368,051)
Canada (161,599)
KIN 284 (1)
All (1)
Chapter

284 Topic #3

6 Pages
85 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Kinesiology
Course
KIN 284
Professor
All Professors
Semester
Spring

Description
Topic 3 –  Emergence of  Behavior:  Theoretical  Foundations 3.1: Newell’s  Model of  Constraints Newell’s Model of  Constraints (1986) Individual Constraints  Task Constraints Environmental Constraints ­ This model accounts for individual variability. States that a movement is a result  of the dynamic interaction between individual, task and environmental  constraints. Changing one element may lead to a completely different movement  pattern.  We must consider all dimensions to understand motor development and  how movement emerges. Constraints either permit a movement to emerge or  restrict a movement from occurring.  ­ How can we manipulate things to push the system in the direction we want?  Manipulate the task, maybe intervene on functional constraints, surgery/  operations for structural constraints.  ­ Individual constraints: a person’s own unique mental and physical characteristics.  May be structural (related to the structure of the body, e.g. height) or functional  (related to behavior, e.g. motivation). Structural are often long term constraints  and functional are often short­term constraints.  ­ A malformed limb introduces a structural constraint that gives rise to a different  movement then what would emerge if the limb were typically developed. It’s not  that the movement cannot be achieved. It just occurs through a different  development pattern.  ­ What are some individual constraints for a child using the monkey bars?  Structural constraints include: arm length and strength while functional  constraints may include fear or lack of.  o Risk taking and challenges are critical.  ­ Task constraints: constraints external to the body and consist of goals of the  movement, as well as the rules and equipment used. For example the rules of  soccer dictate that you cannot touch the ball with your hands, which places a task  constraint on the resultant movement. Another example is a car seat, however  equipment like this becomes problematic when we start restraining movements  too much.  ­ Environmental constraints: global constraints related to the world outside our  body, around us. These may be physical (e.g. temperature) or sociocultural (e.g.  girls & sport). For example the terrain a cyclist faces will introduce an  environmental constraint on the resultant movement.  ­ 3.2: Phases of Motor Development The Developmental Continuum Specialized Movement Phase Fundamental Movement Phase  Rudimentary Movement Phase  Reflexive Movement Phase ­ Reflexive movement phase: involuntary, subcortically controlled movements that  are a relatively stereotypical response to a specific sensory stimulus. Grounded in  the idea that reflexes are maturationally determined. Reflexes are the first forms  of human movement.  ­ Rudimentary movement phase: development of the basic forms of voluntary  movement typically mastered during infancy required for basic functioning.  Originally suggested to be maturationally determined, however now we know that  they are very much so influenced by the environment, cases of severe deprivation  provide evidence for the role the environment plays; characterized by a highly  predictable sequence of appearance, rate varies individually.  ­ Fundamental movement phase: gross motor skills common to daily living and  should typically be mastered in early childhood. Exploration of a variety of  stabilizing (e.g. twisting), locomotor (e.g. hopping), and manipulation )e.g.  kicking) movements, first in isolation, then in combination.  ­ Specialized movement phase: fundamental motor skills are progressively refined,  combined, and elaborated upon for application to task specific activities required  for daily living, recreation, and sport pursuits.  The Hour Glass Model  ­ The  sand  represents motor skills from a developmental perspective. How do we get more  sand into the hourglass?  ­ The heredity container has a lid, which represents a limited quantity of “sand”, or  in other words genetics play a limited role in motor skill development. ­ The environment container of sand does not have a lid and this can be interpreted  into the fact that there is not a limit to the magnitude of impact that the  environment can have on an individual’s motor skill development.  ­ Hourglass model is used to represent lifelong motor development because this  process is made up of the period of progression as well as regression. We can get  more sand during the regression phase by lets say continuing to be physically  active, but at some point more sand will be leaking out than can be replaced.  ­
More Less

Related notes for KIN 284

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit