Textbook Notes (368,875)
Canada (162,227)
Justice (21)
JUST*1010 (8)
Chapter 3

Criminal Offences – Chapter 3.docx

10 Pages
113 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Justice
Course
JUST*1010
Professor
Kim O' Toole
Semester
Winter

Description
Criminal Offences – Chapter 3 Causation in the Criminal Law  • Where an essential element of the actus reus of an  offence is in the occurrence of certain specified  consequences, it must be proved that the defendant’s  conduct actually caused those consequences  o Example: Would Paolo’s death have occurred  anyway even if Marco had not been assaultive  towards him? • In all cases where consequences of an essential  element the of actus reus, it is clear that the Crown  must prove that, “but for” the actions of the accused,  the prohibited consequences would not have occurred  Nette Case (2001):  • The Supreme Court ruled that there are two – quite  distinct – issues that must be considered in  determining whether or not the accused’s conduct  caused a certain prohibited consequence: factual  causation (or causation in fact) and legal causation  (or causation in law)  Factual Causation • In order to establish factual causation, the Crown must  prove that, “but for” the accused’s conduct, the  prohibited consequences would never have occurred • Generally a simple task o Can often be determined by scientific or other  expert evidence  • Just because there is a casual link between the accused  person’s conduct and the prohibited consequence does  not necessarily mean that he or she should be held  criminally responsible  o It needs to be “but for” Legal Causation  • Even if there is a link in fact between the accused  person’s conduct and the prohibited consequence, it  must still be decided whether the conduct should be  considered sufficiently blameworthy to warrant  criminal punishment  • The courts consider prohibited consequences to be  imputable to the accused person only if they were  foreseeable  • Foreseeability, whether or not a consequence was  foreseeable – is also a central issue in deciding  whether the mens rea elements of the offence in  question have been proved • If the consequences of one’s actions are foreseeable, it  is easy to conclude that there is a causal link between  those actions and their consequences  o The requirement of foreseeability ensures that an  accused person’s criminal responsibility for  his/her actions is not unlimited; he/she can be  punished for the prohibited consequences that  could be foreseen  SPECIFIC RULES CONCERNING CAUSATION IN  HOMICIDE CASES • There are a number of special rules concerning he  issue of causation in relation to such offences as  murder, manslaughter, infanticide, criminal negligence  causing death, dangerous driving causing death, and  impaired driving causing death  THE DEFITNITION OF DEATH FOR PURPOSES OF  CRIMINAL LAW  • The Crown must prove that the victim was in fact  dead after the accused inflicted injuries on him/her • In most cases criminal courts have no difficult  deciding when a human being has died  • In today’s hospitals, it is possible to use life­support  machines that artificially maintain heart and  circulatory functions, and the application of this  medical technology can potentially create some  difficulties for criminal courts that are faced with the  problem of pinpointing the moment when a patient can  legitimately be considered dead  • Parliament has not kept up with modern medical  technology and has not defined “death” for the  purposes of criminal law • The Law Reform Commission of Canada  recommended that death should be defined in  legislation in a manner that is consistent with modern  medical developments  o Commission advocated this definition: “a person  is dead when an irreversible cessation of all that  person’s brain functions has occurred”  • Where an individual is not connected to a life support  machine, death will be determined on the basis of  whether breathing or blood circulation is still taking  place  • Various medical protocols have been developed to  provide guidance to physicians who are called upon to  determine whether an individual who is on life support  has suffered total brain death  • It takes considerable time before it can be determined  beyond question that total brain death has occurred  when the patient is being kept artificially alive by life­ support machines  • Adoption of the Law Reform Commission’s definition  of death would clearly resolve any uncertainty that  currently exists in Canada  • Until 1999, the Criminal Code (section 227) had a rule  that an accused person could not be convicted of an  offence of homicide unless the death of the victim  occurred “within one year and one day from the time  of the occurrence of the last event by means of which  he/she caused or contributed to the cause od death”  ACCELERATION OF DEATH  • If a physician administers a lethal dose of a drug with  the clear intention of carrying out a “mercy killing”,  he/she is guilty of murder;  o Active euthanasia: deliberately taking steps to  terminate the life of another person – not  permitted under Canadian law o Section 14 of the Criminal Code “no person is  entitled to have death inflicted upon him” and  that the criminal liability of the person who  inflicts death, in such circumstances, is not  affected by the giving of such consent  • A physician does not commit murder where he/she  acts on a request by a competent adult patient to  withdraw treatment and death ensues as a consequence  o The physician is required to withdraw treatment  in these circumstances since every competent  adult has the r
More Less

Related notes for JUST*1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit