Textbook Notes (368,107)
Canada (161,650)
Justice (21)
JUST*1010 (8)
Chapter 6

Criminal Offences Chapter 6.docx

7 Pages
58 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Justice
Course
JUST*1010
Professor
Kim O' Toole
Semester
Winter

Description
Criminal Offences Chapter 6 STRICT AND ABSOLUTE LIABILITY  • The Crown must prove some form of mens rea in order to obtain the conviction of  an offender for a true crime o Different for regulatory offences (all the Crown normally has to prove are  the actus reus elements) REGULATORY OFFENCES AND ABSOLUTE LIABILITY In the past, regulatory offences were described as being offences of absolute liability:  • If the Crown could prove actus reus then the issue of fault was considered to be  completely irrelevant  • Those charged with regulatory offences were not given the opportunity to argue  that they were not to blame for what had happened  Ping Yuen (1921) • Accused was a vendor of soft drinks • A police officer searches his business and removed 5 bottles of soft drinks from  the accused’s stock • It was found that three of them contained a % of alcohol in excess of the amount  by the Saskatchewan Temperature Act, 1917 • Accused was charged w/ violation of the act • At his trial: found that the accused didn’t know that any of the bottles contained  more alcohol than the law permitted  • Even the prosecution admitted that it wasn’t possible for the accused to test any of  the bottles w/out destroying their contents for sale purposes; there was no  practical way in which the accused could have avoided breaking the law • The accused was convicted on the offence  o The court ruled that Ping Yuen’s offence was not a “true crime” to which  any stigma attached, it was an act prohibited in the public interest under  the threat of a financial penalty • Even though Ping Yuen had acted no differently than any “reasonable” retailer  would have in the circumstances, he was still convicted of the offence • He was not blameworthy in any sense whatsoever but his lack of fault was  considered irrelevant by the courts • He was fined $50  THE ARGUMENTS FOR AND AGAINST ABSOLUTE LIABILITY For: • Those individuals who engage in activities that may harm the public welfare  should be required to meet a high standard of care and attention • Many people believed that, by requiring the Crown to prove mens rea in relation  to regulatory offences, to many legal loopholes would be created for individuals  and corporations to avoid their responsibilities to the public  o It was argued that absolute liability would remove such loopholes and  therefore would act as an “incentive” for such persons to take  precautionary measures, over and above those that would normally be  taken in order to ensure that mistakes and accidents did not occur o If an individual or corporation realizes that there are no legal loopholes to  slip through when they are charged with a regulatory offence, then they  will take an extraordinary degree of care to avoid committing such an  offence  • Administrative efficiency o It would be too great a burden for the Crown to prove mental culpability in  relation to the great number of minor offences that come before the courts o The Crown must have access to a quick and administratively efficient  system of law enforcement  o If the Crown were required to establish mens rea in relation to regulatory  offences, the whole system of justice would get messed up and as a result,  hundreds of thousands of violators would escape conviction  o Absolute liability is a necessity if there was to be effective regulation of  trade, commerce, and industry in the country Against • Absolute liability contradicts a deeply ingrained sense of justice since it punishes  those who lack any moral culpability o It’s a basic notion in our society that a person who lacks moral culpability  should not be convicted of a criminal offence  • It destroys the individual citizen’s basic freedom of choice o The doctrine of mens rea is designed to maximize person freedom because  only the individual who deliberately chooses to break the law is subject to  conviction o Absolute liability would destroy such freedom since it is not based on  individual culpability   Sault Ste. Marie (1978) Arguments against absolute liability: (Judge Dickson of the Supreme Court of Canada) • It violates fundamental principles of penal liability • It rests upon assumptions which have not been, and cannot be empirically  established  • No evidence that a higher standard of care results from absolute liability o If a person is already taking every reasonable precautionary measure, is he  likely to take additional measures, knowing however much care he takes,  it will not serve as a defense in the event of breach? o If he has exercised care and skill, will conviction have a deterrent effect  upon him or others? o Will the injustice of conviction lead to cynicism and disrespect for the law,  on his part and the part of others? • No stigma attached doesn’t matter: the accused will have suffered a loss of time,  legal costs, exposure to the process of criminal law at trial, and the opprobrium of  conviction  Chapin (1979) • Judge Dickson: difficulty of enforcement is not per se a convicting reason for  imposing absolute liability THE EMERGENCE OF A NEW APPROACH IN THE COURTS: THE “HALFWAY  HOUSE” APPROACH • Once the Courts have decided that an offence was regulatory in nature, they  would routinely impose absolute liability and thereby deprive the defendant of  any defense based on his/her lack of fault The halfway house approach: • Finds a middle ground between, on the one hand, requiring the Crown to prove all  the mens rea elements of an offence beyond a reasonable doubt and, on the other,  automatically convicting an accused person merely because he/she has committed  the actus reus of a regulatory offence  • Provides that the Crown has to prove that the accused committed the actus reus  elements of the regulatory offence in question – the burden of proof shifts to the  accused to establish his/her innocence by proving on the balance of probabilities  that he/she was not negligent s • Placing an onus of establishing their innocence upon the accused is different from  the normal rules of criminal law that apply in relation to real crimes  • The “halfway house” approach gives the Crown a significant advantage when  prosecuting individuals for regulatory offences  o The advantage is based on the fact that the Crown doesn’t have to prove  any mental element in relation to such offences • The “halfway house” approach does permit defendants to advance a defense:  however, they must establish this “due diligence” defense on the balance of  probabilities in 
More Less

Related notes for JUST*1010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit