Textbook Notes (368,317)
Canada (161,798)
CMN3105 (11)
Chapter

CMN 3105 Reading #9.docx

8 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
CMN3105
Professor
Stuart Chambers
Semester
Fall

Description
CMN 3105: Reading #9  Nov 23 2013  The Neoconservative Revolution  He chose instead to toe the line drawn by his secretary of Stale, Golin Powell: “The United States stands  ready to assist, not insist America’s “newisolationism” One group aligned itself with Powell, who reflected the State Department’s tradition of international  diplomacy, and with the CIA, whose culture of cautious realism stressed international order, not upheaval. The opposite position) represented by the Pentagon’s civilian directors, favored talking advantage of the  nation’s unprecedented status as sole superpower to radically transform the world order.  Paul Wolfowitz, Vice President Richard Cheney and tee Richard Perle The September n attacks impelled George W. Bush toward the worldview of this second group.  Nevertheless, in the months following September 11 the neocons enjoyed an extraordinary degree of  influence at the highest decision­making levels of the Bush administration.  The roots of neoconservatism can be traced back to the 1960s, to a group of disaffected activists, many of  whom were liberals or radi°ais before ^”ning their backs on their comrades in arms.  . As one of the movement’s founders, the essayist Irving Kristol, put it vividly: “A neoconservative is a  Liberal who has been mugged by reality.”  Kristol was the quintesiential neoconservative.  The person whose work helped Kristol articulate this worldview was Leo Strauss. A German Jewish  immigrant of the previous generation, Strauss began his career as a philosopher during the Weimar  Republic.  He attributed this process to a rejection of universal verities in favor of relativism, historicism, and what Max  Weber called “axiological neutrality.’  For him, there could be no moral jquivalency between democracy and totalitarianism, good and evil. When  necessary, democratic societies must be willing to use force against evil in order to survive.  A profound pessimism regarding the common people—so easily .seduced by the century’s demagogues— marked Strauss’s work.  The young neoconservatives who came to Washington during the Reagan years seized upon the Afghan  constrategy to combat communism around the globe. It was in pursuit of this single­minded Cold War  strategy that the so­called Iran­Contra affair emerged. Among the Reagan operatives who arranged the Iran­Contra deal while also aiding Iraq, the mantra was to  defeat ^communism and promote the spread of democracy, freedom, and capitalism around the globe,  using all means at their disposal. George H. W. Bush, supported by an international coalition, turned back the Iraqi army’s invasion of Kuwait  in Operation Desert Storm—an exemplary practical application of Wohlstetter’s theories regarding  preemptive air strikes. This strategy combined military power with politics in a new way. In theory, it allowed the United States and  its allies to target “rogue” regimes selectively and to punish the ruling elites of those countries while  promoting and strengthening civil society.  But President Bush, a former director of the CIA who was running for reelection, did not share Wolfowitz’s  worldview. He had fault his personal fortune on petroleum, an industry that prefers political and financial  realism nourished by long­term investment returns over ideological indulgence. Its “two ruling passions,” anti­communism and “its revulsion against the counterculture,” no longer had an  object by the mid­1990s. Communism had disappeared, and the only remaining traces of the counterculture  were its commercial exploitation by the establishment.  The American government was lazily following the norms and institutions that emerged in the wake of World  War II and that, according to The Weekly Standard, had became irrelevant with the fall of the USSR. It was  time to realign and, if necessary, disrupt traditional diplomatic practices in order to promote the American  model of democracy, capitalism, and vested interests around the globe. Ire. Itwas time for the United States to achieve the unparalleled military superiority envisaged during the  Reagan years, by devoting at least a quarter of the federal budget to defense. Through a massive  investment in advanced weaponry, the United States could guarantee world peace by dissuading potential  enemies from attacking, and also promote democratic ideals by “putting pressure on right­wing Jand left­ wing dictatorships alike.”  Civilized nations” would place themselves under its aegis, for their own good and that of humanity. Those  «*o did not would be labeled rogue states and could expect to he brought to their knees sooner or later, if  they refused to mend their ways.   Worldview found a home in June 1997,  Project for the New American Century (PNAC), this think tank admonished and excoriated politicians  throughout the government in order to influence the foreign policy choices of the Clinton administration. But the Muslim world is neither monolithic n<>r homogenous. It has many centers, all of which compete for  hegemony over political and religious values.  It placed a facile way of thinking in the service of a precise political agenda, aimed at expanding the  American democratic model into the Middie East­the only part of the world that it had not penetrated at the  end of the twentieth century—and at modifying U.S. policy in the region to give Israel’s security precedence  over an alliance with pie Saudi petro­monarchy.  Whatever its expression, whether moderate or radical, conservative or revolutionry, peaceful or violent— even terrorist—Islamism asserted its authenticity and altruism, its lack of concern with anything but the  interests of the people from whom it had emerged, rather than those of foreign powers or global oil  producers. Beyond these general principles of political and economic de.mocratization, another pressing consideration  led the neocons to challenge the regimes in power in the Middle East: the imperatives of Israel’s security  and permanence.  Replete with danger, and a sign of weakness, this exchange had to be replaced by the logic of “peace for  peace.” Israel’s new agenda,” the authors concluded, could ^signal a clean break by abandoning a policy which  assumed exhaustion and allowed strategic retreat by reestablishing the principle preemption, rather than  retaliation alone and by ceasing to absorb blows to the nation without response.”  The trigger of this process, whose goal was to foment a true revolution in American fo
More Less

Related notes for CMN3105

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit