Textbook Notes (368,559)
Canada (161,962)
CMN3133 (20)
Chapter

CMN 3133 Reading #6.docx

10 Pages
53 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Communication
Course
CMN3133
Professor
herrara-vega
Semester
Fall

Description
CMN 3133: Reading #6 Oct 20th 2013  Selective Exposure to Information: A critical Review David O. Sears and Jonathan L. Freedman  Communication bias and attitude bias actually correlate and by considering other factors than attitude bias  might account for selectivity.  Selective exposure­It is a basic fact in the thinking of many social scientists about communication effects. Nevertheless, the empirical literature on selective exposure has been rather unsatisfying. Clarify what is meant by selective exposure­ then to characterize the evidence leading to its use and finally  to evaluate the evidence regarding whether or not there is a psychological tendency to prefer supportive to  non­ supportive information.  Definition:  Any systematic bias in audience composition. Sometimes it is used to describe any bias whatever in the  composition of a communication audience, as long as the bias can be correlated with anything unusual in  communication content. Partisan exposure is said to be present. Berelson and Steiner: human behaviour­ “people tend to see and hear communications that are favorable  or congenial to their predispositions; they are more likely to see and hear congenial communications than  neutral or hostile ones” Unusual agreement about a matter of opinion­  matters of opinion  Selectivity describes audience bias in the direction of agreeing to an unusual extent with the  communicator’s stand on an issue relevant to the communication. Klapper summarized the point this way: “by and large. People tend to expose themselves to those mass  communications which are in accord with their existing attitudes” They only assert that communication audiences usually share to an extraordinary degree, the viewpoints of  the communicator.  “De facto selectivity” preference for supportive rather than non­supportive information.   People are thought actively to seek out material that supports their opinions, and actively to avoid material  that challenges the,.  “it is likely that a desire for re enforcement of ones own point of view exists.” People expose themselves to communications with which they already agree and do not expose  themselves to those with which they disagree, because they actively seek the former and actively avoid the  latter.  Presumably because of a general psychological preference for compatible information.  De facto selectivity and selective exposure:  Students tended to read newspapers whose editorial policy was the closest to their own opinions..  Each of these demonstrations shares a common basis: the correlation of positions on an attitude dimension  with an act or a series of acts of exposure to mass communications. Measurement problems  : even so, many reports of de facto selectivity may well overestimate the  magnitude of the effect because of the kinds of measures used.  antedate the oppurtunities for exposure, as for instance, when the respondent is known to have bought a  car before the specific ads in questions appeared or in panel studies. None of these is a substitute for an advance measure, and each one maximizes the probability of obtaining  de facto selectivity, since any attitude change is likely to reduce the discrepancy between communications  and respondents position rather than increase it.  Alternative predictors:   two general possibilities arise when we consider whether other variables are  better predictors of selectivity than attitudes.  Political conservatism predicted attendance rather well, but then so did a variety of other background  variables. In fact, a substantial number of Crusaders ascribed their own attendance to church influence. So  it may be quite arbitrary to give ideology the major credit for exposure even in this seemingly obvious case.  Public affairs , communications most powerfully, years of education. Now, clearly, de facto selectivity effects  could be obtained with any issue about which highly educated people generally disagree with poorly  educated people.  Pro­civil liberties, pro­civil rights and internationalist positions, pro UN campaigns  Reaches mainly those sympathetic to it.  “if there was an increase to exposure (during the campaign) it was their previous orientation (attitude toward  the UN) which determined the extent to which people exposed themselves to further information about the  United Nations” These are all things that well educated people are likely to do more than poorly educated people,  regardless of how they feel about the UN Thus, many reports of de facto selective exposure may represent little more than cases in which highly  educated persons, who normally are overrepresented in any audience for public affairs presentations, also  share a common set of political, social and/or economic attitudes. Conclusion:   so on several groups, published reports of de facto selectivity  fall somewhat short of  representing ideal proof that people do in fact “tend to expose themselves to those mass communications  which are in accord with their existing attitudes.  The communications have been most often, written articles offered in a way that clearly communicates their  positions on the issue. Supportive information is usually defined simply as the communicators taking the same general position as  the subject and non­supportive as his taking the opposite position. Some subjects were given a choice among positively oriented articles, and these subjects significantly  preferred those favorable to the chosen exam.  In other words, supportive information was preferred among the former subjects, non­supportive slightly  preferred among the latter.  Rosen’s feelings are both striking and odd.  The two studies considered together, provide evidence about every kind: with positive articles, subjects  prefer supportive information; with negative articles, they have no preference; and with titles advocating  reversal of choice and (thus clearly differing in supportiveness), they strongly prefer non supportive  information.  So partisan hip was not absent, but it operated on information evaluation rather than on information  selection.  Conclusions:   By now it must be clear that there is no consistent result in this research. Five studies showed some  preference for supportive information: Ehrilich (1957), Freedman and Sears (1963). Adams (1961), Mills et al. (positive articles) (1961 and Rosen  (1961) Cognitive Dissonance and selective exposure:   Even if there is no general preference in one way or the other, there must be conditions under which  supportive information will be preferred.  Cognitive dissonance theory­ two specific hypotheses have been offered, each based on the assumption  that dissonance may be reduced or avoided by selectivity in information seeking.  Voluntary exposure to information:  As indicated above, clearly the most powerful known predictor of voluntary exposure to mass  communication of informational of public affairs sort is the general factor of education and social class.  So in contrast to the rather pale and ephemeral effects fo selectivity, de facto or otherwise, education yields  enormous differences. Why it produces such differences is not known and remains a provocative question,  and a subtler one than might a
More Less

Related notes for CMN3133

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit