Textbook Notes (368,795)
Canada (162,165)
Criminology (258)
CRM3314 (6)
Chapter

Drugs Notes 4

7 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM3314
Professor
Carolyn Gordon
Semester
Fall

Description
Decriminalization/Legalization Regulating Drug Use Strategies • Decriminalization­ look over small amounts of certain drugs, use law enforcement for bigger  problems • Harm reduction • Legalization­ drugs are going to be regulated like any other commodity, less state intervention  Decriminalization • Use should not be criminalized  possession= proof (convenience)  • State cannot punish users • No implications for producers or sellers­ these can remain criminalize  • Is version of decriminalization would be reminiscent of prohibition in the 20’s and 30’s.  • Harder to prove use itself  Reasons for Decriminalization • Use of drugs prohibited only for specific purposes • Efficacy never explained • Punishment must satisfy strict standard of justification  • Principle of harm  paternalistic argument (state taking on a parental role saying drugs are  harmful, need to protect our citizens from them, need to protect people from potentially making bad  decisions, prohibition is going to deter people from using because things are illegal) • Protectionist argument • Perfectionist argument (prevents people from living in good ways or bad ways, lacking motivation,  not being able to focus, people are wasting their lives, state needs to intervene to prevent these  things from happening) • *Risk of harm? Drug Harms Primary Health Harms • Toxicity acute/chronic • Addiction/dependence psycho­social factors + physiological processes Secondary health and social risks/harms • Deprivation, family adversity, burdening health care system, society at harm Reasons fro Criminalization • Deterrence Specific and general • Monetary costs must stay high • Punitive policies must remain • Or else people won’t be deterred  • *”forbidden fruit” effect? • When you prohibit things, you make those things more eluring to individuals  • Only able to punish some of the people that engage in the behaviour, that becomes problematic  because the people that get caught are the people with the least amount of power  • Think it is good because it is deterring everyone  Decriminalization • Does not need to extend to sale of drugs, costs wont be impacted • Compensation for harms?  legal remedies  higher prices, incentive to make drugs safer • *Big pharma model? • Could say we tax it, prices remain high, or we could decriminalize usage aka possession  • Could deal with harms­ force dealers to help the people who are harmed by consuming these  products  • Producers have to pass the cost down on the user  • Use of all drugs can be decreased without punishment  decline in licit drug use • Increase of illicit drugs under a decriminalized scheme= decrease in total harms from all drugs • People would substitute smoking or drinking for smoking marijuana • *Discriminatory policies? • We can rake measures as a society without punishment that diminish the drugs people use, so  decriminalization is the way to go  • Trying to have it both ways, say it is bad but allowing a leeway for people to process and use  Cannabis Coffeeshop System Netherlands, 1976 • “Gateway hypothesis” as rationale  soft drugs hard drugs • Avoid contact between social and economic networks  • Gateway hypothesis is used as a rational for why we shouldn’t decriminalize • Gateway hypothesis says the use of soft drugs will lead to the use of hard drugs  • Would disrupt the social and economic links between cannabis use and users and hard drugs and  users  • Avoid contact between these two networks  Dutch Policy of Tolerance • Coffee shops exist in legal grey area • Personal use <5 grams a day (may not sell more) • Only “soft” drugs sold no alcohol • Ban on advertising • 18 years of age and older • Public consumption is banned  • Addiction is a much broader issue  The Dutch Experience • More likely to use? • Escalation of use? • Gateway hypothesis? • Commercialization effect? • Higher treatment? • Costs? • US rates of youth users greater than in the Netherlands, Dutch users rank high for cannabis use,  but they drink far less, and they use illicit substances far less than in any other places  • Higher availability of cannabis but the rates of availability outside of coffee shops still fall short of  the US where it is prohibited  • People continuation rate in the Netherlands is lower, users mature out of usage  • Forbidden fruit effect might be in place  • In this country cocaine and amphetamine use is lower than else where, has disrupted the networks  between hard drugs and soft drugs  • Usage rates increased when commercialization occurred, this mirrors effects we have seen when  things like tobacco and alcohol have been commercialized  • Higher treatment rates in the Netherlands­ more likely to offer people the means to be treated and  people take them up on this  • High prices in the Netherlands  • Cannot grow your own weed in the Netherlands  Critiques • People say prohibition doesn’t address root causes, it is a smoke screen that allows us to ignore  factors that lead people to use drugs  • Schemes discuss the root causes, that most drug use is recreational  • Attend to underlying causes? No • Do they eliminate the criminal marketplace? No Ant prohibitionist think we should be eliminating  the black market • Market for drugs is demand lead  • Production and supply is highly profitable, organized crime can insert its way into this gap  • Does it reduce crime?­ prohibition causes crime  • Using illegal drugs is an expensive pursuit  • Say certain things to prevent people from engaging in a certain behaviour  • Does this make all drugs safer? No • It might make some safer, but it does not make all drug use safer  • Does it address how we address race and crime? No  • Restore our rights and responsibilities? Who gets to tell us what we can and cant do with out  bodies  • The state adopts a paternal role in guiding what we can do with our bodies  • Decriminalization does not do any of this  Management Approaches  Prohibiton­­­­­­­­ free market Criminalization           legalization  These models are absolutist  Need to be a new way that deal with the harms that result from drug use  Conservative government has a new 1.3 billion free market plan for medical marijuana  This new freemarket system is going to be able to provide 500 000 people with quality marijuana  4200 licensed growers, allowed to have 2 customers e
More Less

Related notes for CRM3314

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit