Textbook Notes (368,566)
Canada (161,966)
CIN2101 (5)
Chapter

CIN 2190 Reading #5 .docx

7 Pages
73 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Film Studies
Course
CIN2101
Professor
Florian Grandena
Semester
Winter

Description
CIN 2170: Reading #5 March 7th 2013  A Certain Tendency in French Cinema: Francois Truffaut  Although the French cinema is represented by 100 or so films per year, it goes without saying that a mere  ten to twelve of them deserve to attract the attention of critics and cinephiles, and therefore the attention of  Cahiers du cinema.  Then French scriptwriting developed significantly thanks to Jacques Pérvert: Le Quai des brumes {Port of  Shadows)  remains the masterpiece of the so­called ‘poetic realism’ school. At about the same time, some excellent little novels by Pierre Bost were being published by the Nouvelle  revue francaise (NRF). Aurenche and Bost teamed up for the first time when they adapted and wrote the  dialogue ofDouce {Love Story), directed by Autant­Lara. Equivalence  The touchstone of adaptation as practiced by Aurenche and Bost is the so­called I process of equivalence.  This process takes for granted that in the novel being adapted there are filmable and unfilmable scenes,  and that instead of scrapping the latter (as used to be done) you had to think up equivalent scenes; in other  words ones that the author of the novel might have written for the screen. Aurenche and Bost’s entire reputation is based on two specific points: 1.Faithfulness to the spirit of the  works they adapt. 2. The talent they put into the task.  [in addition they wrote an adaptation of Georges Bernanos’s novel, Le Journal d’un cure de champagne  {Diary of a Country Priest), which was never filmed, a script about Joan of Arc, only part of which has just  been filmed (by script and dialogue L’Auberge rouge  { The Red Inn), directed bv Aurant­Lara. It also has to be remembered that Aurenche and Bost have worked with a wide range of directors.  Delannoy, for example, likes to see himself as a mystical moralist.  (Andre Bazin concluded his excellent article, ‘La Stylistique de Robert Bresson’ (‘Robert Bresson’s  Stylistics’), as bllows: ‘After Le Journal d’un curede champagne, Aurenche and Bost are no more than the  Viollet­le­Ducs of adaptation.’ All those who admire and are familiar with Bresson’s film will remember the  wonderful scene in a confessional where, as Bemanos puts it, Chantal’s face ‘began to appear little by little,  gradually. The mask ripped off: A simple reading of that extract reveals: 1. A constant and deliberate determination to be unfaithful to both  the spirit and the letter.  2. A very marked predilection for profanation and blasphemy.  The same unfaithfulness to the spirit also mars Le Diable au corps, a love story which becomes an anti­ militaristic,  anti­bourgeois film;5 La  Symphonie pastorale, which becomes the storv of a priest in love,  turning Gide into a kind off Beatrix Beck; Un Recteurde Vile de Sein, ambiguously retitled Dieu a besoin  des homes, in which the islanders are portrayed like the ‘cretins’ in Luis Bunuel’s Las Hurdes {Land without  Bread). As for a fondness for blasphemy, it is constantly in evidence, to a more or less insidious degree,  depending on the subject, the director or even the film star.  Aurenche and Bost would seem ideally cut out to be authors out­and­out anti­clerical films, but since  movies portraying men in cassocks are in fashion, they agreed to go along with the trend. But as it is  incumbent upon them, or so they believe, not to betray their convictions, themes such as wool over the  producer’s ews’ while at the same time satisfying him, and how to do the same to an equally satisfied  general public.  Looking at the uniformity and unrelenting vulgarity of scripts nowadays, we find we miss Prevert. He  believed in the devil, and therefore in God, and if it was purely his whim to burden most of his characters  with all the sins of creation, there was always room for a couple for whom, like some latter­day Adam and  Eve, the story would take a turn for the better once the film was over. There are only seven or eight  scriptwriters who work regularly for the French cinema. Each of them has only one story to tell, and as each  of them can dream of nothing but becoming as successful as the ‘two greats’, it is hardly an exaggeration to  say that at the 100 or so French films made each year tell the same story: there is always a victim, usually a  cuckold. (This cuckold would be the only attractive character in the film were he not always infinitely  grotesque, like the character played by Bernard Blier in Maneges.)  ‘They’re always the ones that have money [or are blessed with luck, love or happiness]. When it comes  down to it, it’s all so unfair.’  The dominant feature of psychological realism is its determination to be antibourgeois. But who are  Aurenche and Bost, Sigurd, Jeanson, Autant­Lara and Allegret if not bourgeois?  It emerges that working­class audiences may prefer naïve little foreign films which depict men ‘as they  should be’ rather than as Aurenche and Bost believe them to be. It is always a pleasure to wind up a discussion: that way, everyone is happy. It is remarkable that ‘great’  metteurs­en­scene and ‘great’ scriptwriters all spent a Long time making minor little films, and that the talent they put into making h to set them apart from the rest  (those with no talent). It is also noteworthy that they all espoused the quality ethos at the same time, just as  one might pass on a good address to a friend.  So­called ‘courageous’ films have turned out to be very profitable. The trouble is that, if you keep on repeating to audiences that they identify with the central characters of  films, they will end up believing you; and the day they realize that the roly­poly old cuckold whose  misadventures are supposed to prompt sympathy (a little) and laughter (a lot) is not, as they had thought, a  cousin or a next­door neighbor, but one of them, that the abject may well feel ungrateful towards a cinema  that made such efforts to show them life as it is seen from a fourth­floor flat in Saint­Germain­des­Pres.  I am told that without the celebrated ‘school of psychological realism’ we would never have been graced  with Le Journal d’un cure de champagne Le Carrosse d’or Orphee
More Less

Related notes for CIN2101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit