Textbook Notes (368,552)
Canada (161,962)
CIN2101 (5)
Chapter

CIN 2190 Reading #3.docx

7 Pages
134 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Film Studies
Course
CIN2101
Professor
Florian Grandena
Semester
Winter

Description
CIN 2190: Reading #4  Feb 27th 2013  The Masters of Neorealism: Rossellini, De Sica, and Visconti  The moment in Italian cinematic history known as “neorealism” was a crucial watershed in the evolution of  the seventh art.  Traditional view of Italian neorealism reflects this emphasis on social realism, as can be seen from one very  typical list of its general characteristics: realistic treatment, popular setting, social content, historical  actuality, and political commitment. Andre Bazin  For deep­focus photography, which he contrasted sharply  to the montage of Eisenstein and its ideological  in’ juxtaposition of images and shots. Thus, the neorealist in principle ‘respected” the ontological wholeness  of the reality they filmed, just as the rhythm of their narrated screen time ofte respecting the actual duration  of time within the story, neo realist aesthetics thus opposed the manipulation in the cutting room.  Fellini, “for example, who worked on a number of neorealist productions in various capacities before  beginning his own career as a director in 1950, prejudice,; without conventions coming between it and  myself—facing t without preconceptions, looking at it in an honest way—whatever reality, is, not just social  reality but all that there is within a man. Rossellini remarked that realism was simply the artistic form of the truth” linking neorealism most often to a  moral position similar to Fellini’s rather than to any   preconceived set of techniques or ideological positions.  Rossellini has asserted that f: film must respect two diametrically opposed human tendencies’: ‘that of concreteness and that of imagination. Today we tend to suppress brutally the second one . . .by  forgetting the imaginative tend humanity and to create the robotman who thinks in only one way and tends  toward the concrete  most critical discussion of neorealism emphasizes its relationship to Italian social problems and minimizes  its cinematic artifice.  If film historians had approached their subject matter from a broader perspective, this overemphasis on the  “realism” of films in the immediate postwar period might well have been avoided.  Italian novelists and directors were not concerned only with social literary and cinematographic language  which would enable » them to deal poetically with the pressing problems of their times. As Pavese deal  poetically with the pressing problems or their times.  Thereby creating a “new reality” through an artistic means The controlling of neorealist films or at least the majority of them, was that they dealt with actual problems,  that they employed contemporary stories, and that they focused on believable characters taken most  frequently from Italian daily life. But the greatest neorealist directors never forgot that the world that  projected upon the silver screen was one produced by cinematic conventions rather than an ontological  experience, and they were never so naïve as to deny that the demands of an artistic medium such as film  might be just as pressing as those from the world around them.  The limitations of traditional interpretations of Italian neorealism are immediately apparent from a close  examination of the universally acclaimed masterpieces of the period: Rossellini’s so­called war eulogy— Rome, Open City (1945), Paisan (1946), Germany Year Zero De Sica’s touching portraits ot postwar life in  Shoes bine (Sciuscia, 1946), The Bicycle Thief (1948), or Umberto D. {Umberto D., 1951);and Luchino  Visconti’s synthesis of Vergain The Earth Trembles (La terra tremay 1948).  These seven works do not by any means exhaust the wealth of neorealism, but neorealism’s contribution to  the evolution of cinema must in large measure be ultimately judged by their achievements. Rossellini’s  Rome, Open City represents the landmark film of this group. The conditions of its production (relatively little shooting in the studio, film stock bought on rushes, post­ synchronization of sound to avoid laboratory expenses, limited financial backing) did much to create many  of the myths concerning neorealism.  The tone of the work is thus far more indebted to Rosseliini’s message of Christian humanism than it is to  any programmatic attempt at cinematic realism.  The entire film revolves around Rosseilini’s shifting perspective from a comic to a tragic tone, and nowhere  is this more evident than building which results in her death in the street, mercilessly machine­gunned by  German soldiers as she races towards Francesco, her fiancé” now captured and about to be taken away to  a work camp. This is the  day when Pina and Francesco plan to promise of a better tomorrow for her .and  her family will thus end in despair. Pina’s death, like so many others in wartime, was pointless.  The scene at Gestapo Headquarters in the Via Tasso is justly famous, and it, too, is constructed around the  juxtaposition of different moods and techniques.  Manfredi’s torture is one of the most horrifying of many such scenes in the history of filmmaking; yet,  Rossellini achieves this startling effect on the attention to detailed close­up shots but, rather, by exploiting  power of our imaginations and focusing upon the reactions of Don Pietro.  While Rome, Open City employs a melodramatic plot to overwhelm the viewer with a sense of tragedy and  moves freely from moments of documentary realism to others of theatrical intensity. Its episodic organization presents a step­by­step narrative of the Allied invasion of Italy, beginning with the  early landa moment six months after the liberation of Rome; to the struggle a moment six months after the  liberation of Rome; to the struggle between Partisans and Fascists for control of Florence; to the visit of  three American chaplains to a monastery in the Apennines; and finallyto the capture of Italian Partisans and  their Allied advisers in the Po River Valley. Yet, Rosseliini’s subject it a more philosophical theme—the encounter of two alien cultures. At a more  philosophical theme—the encounter of two alien cultures­ Italian and American.  Rosseliini’s highly mobile camera is employed brilliantly to portray the circumscribed world of the Partisans  from a completely subjective viewpoint: landscape     , never peering above the thin row of reeds in the  marshy river basin never peering above the thin row of reeds in the marshy river basin that provides the  only cover available to these harried men.  The story concludes on a note of desperation and despair rather than hop
More Less

Related notes for CIN2101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit