Textbook Notes (368,804)
Canada (162,172)
Philosophy (346)
PHI1101 (119)
Chapter

PHI 1101.docx

8 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Philosophy
Course
PHI1101
Professor
Iva Apostolova
Semester
Fall

Description
PHILOSOPHY 09/09/2013 Reasoning and Critical Thinking: History of the Idea Philosophy:  ­ The Love of Wisdom – Philo­ “Loving”, Sophia “Knowledge, Wisdom”  ­ Why should we believe what we believe Transition in Thinking:  ­ Old Ways (Before 600BCE):       Thinking is informed by mythology, by stories, by faith      Use myths and Gods to explain – Hence MYTHOLOGY      To Survive = Constant Work (Poverty) – Meaning of life  ­ New Ways (600 BCE):       Economy picks up, life is easier, more time to relax (Econ Growth)       Proof is needed to think, Evidence!!       Life = Work + Leisure (Greek word of School) Causes in Transitions:  ­ The Greeks were trading with other cities­states  ­ The Trading of different goods exposes them to different culture  ­ WHICH, eventually lead to the question of WHY – Why are we different? Why cant we do that? Why WHY  WHY!  Science – Philosophy – Argument:  ­ The new non­mythological/non­religious thinking denies faith and demanded support for belief  ­ Natural Philosophers:      Thales: Water is the first principle of all existence – Life comes from water       Anaxiemenes: Air is the first principle – When air condenses water, air secondary creates Earth  and other basic principles  Methods and Arguments:   ­ Premises – Reasonable, Undisputed Point, Undeniable, Evidence…     A strong argument depends on a strong premises, which proves and states the conclusion  ­ Conclusion – Controversial assertion, The Point of the Argument CHAPTER 1 09/09/2013 The Rational Animal – Humans: (Aristotle)   ­ Trust in the possibility that agreement, mutual understanding can be achieved  ­ Humans are the animals with reasons and logics – Setting us apart from other animals  ­ Being rational – Accomplishes our humanity   ­ True knowledge can only be adjudicated through reason (vs Emotion, Passion, Inspirations…)   ­ True knowledge drives science and philosophy – while science seems to be achieving with their  knowledge Principles: Reason + Animal: Reason: Objective, Universal, Necessary, Timeless, Utopian, Independent, Truth  ­ Black and White   ­ Agreeable by Everyone    ­ Philosophy Animal: Subjective, Local, Contingent, Temporal, Sited, Dependent, Opinion  ­ Animal Nature     ­ Passion      ­ Personal Basic Assumptions:   ­ Skilled to a degree in the rational process of analyzing, defending, and evaluating claims  ­ Improve such skills by becoming aware of the principles behind them and by doing deliberately what is  usually done unreflectively.  ­ Principles are not imposed from the outside but are implicit in the ordinary practices of defending and  evaluating claims.  We are rational creatures, even though we do not always act rationally Knowledge Demands Truth:   ­ Truth becomes central claim of knowledge   ­ Philosophy – The Love of Wisdom Method = Argument:   ­ Premises – Evidence, Data, Observation (Science)  ­ Premises – Logical necessity, Reason  ­ Conclusion – Controversial Assertion       ­ Good argument contains evidence and reasons      ­ Maybe more than one premise to form the conclusion Recognizing Arguments:  ­ Argument = Premise(s) + Conclusion  ­ Two thoughts – Two Claims (Support to become Supported)       ­ One is the controversial (Conclusion)      ­ The other is not so controversial (Premise) Inference: The act or process of deriving logical conclusions from premises known or assumed to be  true  ­ Derive the conclusion – causing the conclusion to be understood as a logical coherent (Usually True) (#  Conclusion = # Inference) CHAPTER 1 09/09/2013 Poor Argument:  Examples:       ­ A bad haircut is still a haircut      ­ A bad egg is still an egg  Recognizing Arguments:   1. Indicator Words – Premise(s), Conclusion      Premise(s) Words: Due to the fact, Given that…       Conclusion Words: Therefore, Concluding, Thus, Hence (forth)…   2. Context – Is something being argued? Dispute? Controversial Material?      ­ Anything that answers the question – Why?      ­ Does the audience reasonably consider the message to be contentious?  3. Moral Claims/ Ethical Claims – Judgments, Well argued but not proven      ­ What is can be demonstrated, shown proven     ­ Whaought  to be only convincingly shown to be so. But never necessarily be shown to be the case     ­ ALL MORAL/ETHNICAL CLAIMS CAN NEVER BE FACT ­ MUST BE ARGUED  4. The Future – Have not happened, thus never be proven     ­ Argued to be taken seriously (Predictions, Forecasts…)      ­ The future is always an argument  Enthymeme: Missing of claim (Non­Existing of Premise(s) or Conclusion)   ­ Unstated premise or conclusion  ­ Implicit claims within an argument Complex Arguments:  ­ More than one debatable claim (Conclusion)  ­ Necessarily means more than one inference  ­ # Inference = # Conclusion CHAPTER 2 09/09/2013 Standard Form:   ­ Simple Arguments: Form is easy to identify (Premiss, Premiss, Conclusion)  ­ Complex Arguments: Inference is not signaled by horizontal line before the last premiss, but numbers  after the proposition (statement/claim)   Those numbers refer to the numbered statements that support the claim   Sub­Arguments are related to the main argument Analysis Strategies:   ­ Conditionals – Contingencies… ­ If blah, then blah   ­ Disjunctions – Or…  ­ Unless – If Not…  ­ Approach the passage in terms of what the sentence will support what claim – WHY??  ­ Don
More Less

Related notes for PHI1101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit