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Alfred Adler.docx

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Department
Psychology
Course
PSY3303
Professor
Peggy Kleinplatz
Semester
Winter

Description
Alfred Adler - Chose the term individual psychology because he was interested in investigating the uniqueness of the person. - He believed that the individual was indivisible and must be studied as a whole. - Understanding an individual entails comprehending his or her attitude in relation to the world. - We are motivated by social interest, and our primary problems are social ones Basic Concepts - Human society is crucial not simply for development if an individual personality, but also for the orientation of each and every behaviour and emotion in a person’s life. - Human beings have tamed their instincts and subordinated them to their attitudes towards the environment. At times, we disobey or deny our natural instincts because of their social relations. Social interest - The urge in human nature to adapt oneself to the conditions of the social environment. - Subjectively in one’s consciousness of having something in common with other people and being one of them. Objectively it is seen in cooperation with others toward the betterment of human society. - Does not automatically emerge, nor does it invariable find constructive expression. It must be nurtured and cultivated. Finalism - If we know a person’s goal, we begin to understand in a general way the individual’s behaviour. - He emphasized the purposefulness of human behaviour by recognizing that the motivational force of every human action is the goal or future orientation of that action. - Adler agreed with Jung that teleology is necessary for a full understanding of personality. For Adler, the goal that the individual pursues is the decisive factor, and he called this concept of goal orientation the principle of finalism. - Many of our goals are fictions: we cannot know whether or not our goals are true or false because there is no way to scientifically test them. In other words, we are unable to have a complete understanding of things as they really are, so we structure our own idea of reality. - Fictional Fictionalism: people create fictions or guiding ideas and then behave “as if” their goals were true o May be healthy or unhealthy o The goal should be judged according to its usefulness Striving for Superiority - The psyche has its primary objective the goal of superiority: the ultimate fictional finalism for which all human beings strive, and it gives unity and coherence to the personality. - Aggression- will to power- power and striving for superiority- finally, he changed from stiving for individual to striving for a superior society. - The strive for superiority meant the desire to be competent and effective in whatever one strives to do. o Perfection- “completed” or “made whole” - He believed it is innate; and part of the struggle for survival that humans share with other species and the process of evolution. - Life is encouraged by the desire to move from below to above, from minus to plus, from inferior to superior. (adapting oneself and mastering its environment) - Inferiority feelings have their origin in our encounter as infants with the environment. We are born immature, incomplete, and incompetent to satisfy even our basic needs. Such feelings are inescapable but also invaluable because they provide the major motivating force that leads to growth. Our efforts and success at growth and development may be seen as attempts to compensate for and overcome our imagined or real inferiorities and weaknesses. - Not deviant but are the basis for all forms of human accomplishment and improvement in life. - Masculine protest: the compensation for one’s inferiorities - Psychological differences between men and women are the result of cultural attitudes and pointed out the devastating effects of these attitudes on the lives of children. Such biases disturb the psychologi
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