Textbook Notes (368,070)
Canada (161,617)
ART3171 (3)
Chapter

Class 5 Abstraction and the Search for the Spiritual

3 Pages
59 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Visual Arts
Course
ART3171
Professor
Celina Jeffrey
Semester
Winter

Description
rd Class 5 Abstraction and the Search for the Spiritual February 3 , 2014 Kazimir Malevich ­the Black Square is his most notorious work, came to base his professional image, virtual icon of radical artistic  modernity, Malevich described it as “the first step of pure creation in art” (didn’t re­work, just did it, not a long  process) in 1916 From Cubin and Futurism… ­Malevich showed work in what he called a ‘Cubo­Futurist’ style in the exhibition Tramway V (Subtitled the ‘First  Futurist Exhibition) in Petrogad, March 1915 ­original futurist movement in 1909 with publishing manifesto by Italian and propagandist Filippo Marinettion front  page of a daily French newspaper ­aim of futurist movement was the modernization of Italian culture ­futurist painting appeared to transfer technical concerns of cubism from conventional world of still life, figures and  landscapes to a more explicitly modern world of urban uprisings and speeding machines Futurists taken with French philosopher Henri Bergson’s idea that change is the essence of reality and consciousness  is a state of continual flux ­Malevich among many European artists for whom the transitional self image of a ‘Futurist’ was the means to  disavow provincialism, to express impatience with the conservative in culture and to assert a commitment to the idea  of s modernized world ­Italian Futurists idea of modernity: concentration on forms of imagery and of ‘force’ which they deemed  characteristic of the modern age and of its typical modes of experience  ­combining modern techniques with references to the abiding virtues of the supposedly ‘primitive’, Malevich proved  himself closer to the mainstream of the avant­garde art in early 20th century ­in summer of 1913 Malevich attended the self­styles ‘first all­Russian congress of futurists’ where the gathering  proposed a futurist form of theatre for M to design; project was aggressively modern, determinedly anti­naturalistic;  M’s designs for sets and costumes employed a Cub­Futurist formal vocabulary consistent with the current manner of  his paintings ­Once Malevich accepted to implications of Black Square his view of practice as an artist changed; ‘I have  transformed myself in the zero of form’ ­M dated his work to when the idea was formed, not when it was physically created …To Suprematism ­idea for Black Square derived from stage design, sometime later what had started as theatrical became transformed  in M’s mind into the initiating work of a would­be global aesthetic which he named Suprematism ­at some point the black square must have appeared as the potentially powerful symbol both of a cultural tabula rasa  and of a point of absolute origin from which a new aesthetic culture could be derived ­1  version of From Cubism and Futurism to Suprematism: The New Realism in Painting was complete for the 0.10  Exhibition, in text M reps Suprematism as the ‘art of the savage’  ­Futurism seen to have failed on two counts: nature of subject matter ensured it would date rapidly and its autonomy  as art was compromised by its adherence to forms of illustration, Suprematism was advanced as the positive counter  to these negatives ­if Black Square was 1  step then what had to follow was a gradual addition of abstract elements to constitute an  extending series ­M seems to have believed that the potential university and the absolute formal autonomy of Suprematist art  qualified as the potential aesthetic base for an entire new world order, M was thus one of the earliest generators of  the Utopian dream The New Realism ­when the revolution came in 1917 M was quick to express his confidence in his own work ­the few surviving works of this period are a series of white on white, the effect is to compress the potential  figurative space of M’s Suprematism into an even narrower rang than the works of 1915­1916 ­works from series shown in Tenth National Exhibition in Moscow in 1919 under the title ‘Non­Objective Creation  and Suprematism’ ­during 1920s there was an increasing tendency for the avant­garde Russian fascists to polarize along the lines of the  split between Idealists and Materialists, various members of Avant­Garde were energetic in task of re­organization,  in early years of Russian Revolution their contributions received some support and encouragement The Limits of Autonomy ­between revolution of 1926 M occupied number of important posts in the reorganized Soviet art­educational  system, at art school in Vitebsk in 1920 he put into practice a teaching regime based on the idea of Suprematism as a  complete and universal system, b/n revolution and mid 1920s he and followers also engaged in ceramics and textiles  and architectural projects of three­dimensional versions of complex Suprematist compositions  ­M completed ‘Introduction to the theory of the “additional element” in painting’ in June 1926 but publication only  got to proof stage because his work proved incomprehensible to the art historians who in 1929 finally achieved the  expulsion of M and his entire department from the State Institute ­in 1927 M invited to exhibit many works in Berlin at the Grosse Berliner Kunstaustellung (Great Berlin Art  Exhibition)  ­works through which M created his artistic self image fall into four broad categories:  • 1911­1912 brightly coloured gouaches which connect to the primitive­expressionist strain of the  Russian and western avant­garde, • following year paintings and drawings in white peasant and landscape sub
More Less

Related notes for ART3171

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit