Textbook Notes (368,122)
Canada (161,660)
Anthropology (373)
ANT101H5 (118)
Chapter 5

Chapter 5 notes.docx

6 Pages
162 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANT101H5
Professor
Sherry Fukuzawa
Semester
Spring

Description
Chapter 5: Macroevolution: Processes of Vertebrate and Mammalian Evolution ­ look back at the ancient roots of human evolution ­ macroevolution  How We Connect: Discovering the Human Place in the Organic World ­ Classification: in biology, the ordering of organisms into categories, such as  orders, families, and genera to show evolutionary relationships  ­ Animal Kingdoms: multicellular organisms that move about and ingest food  ­ 20 major groups called phyla within Kingdom Anamalia  ­ Chordata: the phylum of animal kingdom that includes vertebrates (animals that  have nerve cord, gill slits and a supporting cord along the back) ­ Vertebrates: animals with segmented, bony, spinal columns, includes fishes,  amphibians, reptiles (and birds), and mammals o Have developed brain and senses ­ At each succeeding level, finer distinctions are made between categories until  only one animal is left at the level Principles of Classification  ­ field that establishes rules of classification= taxonomy ­ first classified on physical similarities o must reflect evolutionary descent ­ basic genetic regulatory mechanisms are highly conserved in animals (have  remained unchanged for years) ­ large anatomical modifications don’t always require major genetic rearrangements  ­ Homologies: similarities between organisms based on descent from a common  ancestor.  o Indicator of evolutionary relationship ­ Analogies: similarities between organisms strictly on common function, no  assumed common evolutionary descent (ex. Butterflies and birds) ­ Homoplasy: separate evolutionary development of similar characteristics in  different groups of organism (ex. Wings on birds and butterflies) Constructing Classifications and Interpreting Evolutionary Relationships ­  Evolutionary biologists use 2 major approaches when classifying:   o Evolutionary systematics: traditional approach to classification in which  presumes ancestors and descendants are traced in time by analysis of  homologous characters (traditional) o Cladistics: approach to classification that attempts to make rigorous  evolutionary interpretations based solely on analysis of certain types of  homologous characters (newer) Comparing Evolutionary Systematics with Cladistics ­  bot    are: o interested in tracking evolutionary relationships  o constructing classifications that reflect these relationships o recognize that organisms must be compared using specific features  o focus on homologies ­  differences  are: o cladistics more explicitly/rigorously defines kinds of homologies that have  most useful info o cladistics focuses on traits that distinguish particular evolutionary lineages  o clade: group of organisms (lineages) that share a common ancestor. Group  includes all common ancestors and descendants  o Derived (modified): referring to characters that are modified from the  ancestral condition and thus diagnostic of particular evolutionary lineages  Using Cladistics to Interpret Real Organisms ­ Shared derived: relating to specific character traits shred in common between two  life­forms and considered the most useful for making evolutionary interpretations ­ Phylogenetic tree: a chart showing evolutionary relationships as determined by  evolutionary systematics. It contains a time component and implies ancestor­ descendant relationships o Incorporates dimension of time  ­ Cladogram: a chart showing evolutionary relationships as determined by  cladistics analysis. Its based solely on interpretation of shared derived characters.  It contains no time component and does not imply ancestor descendant  relationship  o Does indicate time o Used to identify and assess the utility of traits and to make testable  hypotheses Definition of Species  ­ Biologists are comparing different species, genera, families, orders and so forth ­ Biological species concept: a depiction of species as groups of individuals capable  of fertile interbreeding but reproductively isolated from other such groups o According to this concept, new species are produced through some form  of isolation  o Ex. Geographical isolation­ an ocean or large river separating populations ­ Speciation: the process by which a new species evolves from an earlier species.  Speciation is the most basic process in macroevolution  ­ Different habitats cause natural selection  ­ Behavioural isolation is behavioural differences  Interpreting Species and Other Groups ­ Age changes o Number of teeth you have when younger and adult  ­ Variation due to sex  ­ Sexual Dimorphism: differences in physical characteristics between males and  females of the same species.  Recognizing Fossil Species ­ Minimum biological category we’d like to define in fossil primate samples is the  species ­ Species is a group of interbreeding or potentially interbreeding organisms that is  reproductively isolated from other such groups ­ What’s the biological significance of this variation (physical differences like teeth  size)? o Either the variation accounted for by individual, age, sex differences 
More Less

Related notes for ANT101H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit