Textbook Notes (368,338)
Canada (161,803)
Biology (653)
BIO153H5 (147)
Chapter 27

Chapter 27 - BIO textbook summary.docx
Premium

4 Pages
103 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIO153H5
Professor
Monika Havelka
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 27  Reading a Phylogenetic Tree: BIOSKILLS 3 ­ Vertical lines =  splitting events ­ node (fork) = where an ancestreal group  splits into two/more descendant groups ­ each node represents most recent  common ancestor of the two  or more descendant populations that  emerge from it ­ if  two or more descendant populations emerge  from a node, node is called polytomy ­ Tip (terminal nodes) = tree’s endpoints,  represents groups living today or a dead  end­ a branch  ending in extinction, names at tips can represent  species or larger  groups such as mammals or conifers Figure above: multiple branches emerge from Node c = polytomy, this means the  populations split from one another so quickly its not possible to tell which split off earlier  ­ Taxon (plural taxa) = any named group of organisms … can be single species or  large group of species ­ Tips connected by a single node on a tree are called sister taxa ­ Outgroup is a taxanomic group known to have diverged prior to rest of taxa in  study ­ Monophyletic group – consists of an ancestreal species and all of its descendants  (taxa 2­6) in the fig above are all part of a monophyletic group, may also be called  lineages or clades and can be identified using “one snip test” 27.1  ­ phylogeny = evolutionary history of a group of organisms ­phylogenetic tree = shows the ancestor descendant relationships among populations or  species, and clarifies whom is related to whom ­ branch = represents population through time ­ two general strategies for using data to estimate  trees: (1) Phenetic approach – based on computing a statistic to summarize overall  similarity among populations based on the data (2) Cladistic approach – based on the realization that relationships among species  can be reconstructed by identifying shared derived characters in the species  being studied (using synapomorphies­ a trait that certain groups of organisms  have that exsist in no others) ­ synapomorphies allow biologists to recognize monophyletic groups, they are  characteristics that are shared because they are derived from traits that exsisted in  their common ancestor ­ ancestreal trait = characteristic that exsisted in an ancestor ­ derived trait = one that is modified form of the ancestreal trait, found in a  descendant How to distinguish between homology & homoplasy ­ problems that arise in those two approaches is that: Traits can be similar in 2  speicies not b/c those traits were present in a common ancestor but b/c similar  traits evolved independently in 2 distantly related groups (e.g. due to mutation,  selection, or drift) ­ Homology = traits are similar due to  shared ancestry ­ Homoplasy = traits are similar for reasons other then common ancestry ­ Convergent evolution = when natural selectin favours similar solutions to the  problems posed by similar way of making a living ­ Convergent traits (analogous traits) don’t occur in the common ancestor of the  similar species ­ to reduce chance that homoplasy will lead to erroneous conclusions abt which  species are most closely related, biologists using cladistics approaches use the  principal of parsimony – the most likely explanation/pattern is the one that  implies the least amt of change ­ the more “parasimonious” a tree is the more likely it is the right one (least amt of  changes) 27.2 ­only the fossil record provides direct evidence abt what organisms that lived in the  past looked like, where they lived, and when they exsisted ­ the fossil record is the total collection of fossils that have been found throughout the  world how do fossils form? ­ most of the processes that form fossils begin when part or all of an organism is  buried in ash, sand, mud, or some o
More Less

Related notes for BIO153H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit