Textbook Notes (368,089)
Canada (161,636)
Biology (653)
BIO210Y5 (63)
Chapter 2

BIO210 – Chapter 2.docx

5 Pages
70 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIO210Y5
Professor
Sanja Hinic- Frlog
Semester
Fall

Description
BIO210 – Chapter 2: The Chemical Level of Organization •  Activation Energy: is the amount of energy needed to start a rxn. • Enzymes: promote chemical rxns by lowering the activation energy requirements  • Catalysts: compounds that accelerate the rate of chemical rxns w/o being consumed/ changed during the rxn • Exergonic (Exothermic) ­ Produce more energy than they use • Endergonic(Endothermic)­ Use more energy than they produce • Acidic pH: o  Lower Than 7.0  o  High H+ concentration o Low OH− concentration • Basic (or alkaline) pH Higher Than 7.0 o  Low H+ concentration o High OH− concentration • pH of Human Blood o Ranges from 7.35 to 7.45 Carbohydrates • Organic Molecules o  Contain H, C, and usually O o Are covalently bonded o Contain functional groups that determine chemistry   Carbohydrates  Lipids  Proteins (or amino acids)    Nucleic acids o Contain carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a 1:2:1 ratio o Monosaccharide — simple sugar  o Disaccharide — two sugars o Polysaccharide — many sugars • Monosaccharides o Simple sugars with 3 to 7 carbon atoms  o  Glucose, fructose, galactose • Disaccharides o Two simple sugars condensed by dehydration synthesis o Sucrose,maltose • Polysaccharides o Many monosaccharides condensed by dehydration synthesis o Glycogen, starch, cellulose • Eicosanoids: are lips derived from arachidonic acid, a fatty acid that must be absorbed in the diet b/c it cannot be  synthesized by the body. There are two major classes: o Leukotrienes : produced mostly by cells involved w. coordinating the responses to injury or disease.  o Prostaglandins: are short­chain fatty acids in which five of the carbon atoms are joined in a ring. These  compounds are released by cells to coordinate or direct local cellular activities and they are extremely  powerful even in small quantities.   prostaglandins from damaged tissues stimulate nerve endings that produce the sensation of pain • glycolipids: Compounds created by the combination of carbohydrate and lipid components. Proteins • Proteins are formed from amino acids and contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen • Proteins perform a variety of essential functions, which can be classifies into seven major categories: 1. Support: Structural proteins create 3D framework for the body, providing strength, organization, and support  for cells, tissues, and organs. 2. Movement: Contractile proteins are responsible for muscular contraction; related proteins are responsible for  the movement of individual cells.  3. Transport: Some things can’t be transferred through the blood unless they are bound to transport proteins.  4. Buffering: provide buffering action and thereby help prevent dangerous changes in cellular and tissue pH. 5. Metabolic Regulation: Enzymes accelerate chemical reactions in cells, control the pace and direction of  metabolic reactions 6. Coordination and Control: protein hormones can influence the metabolic activities of every cell in the body or  affect the function of specific  organs & systems 7. Defense: waterproof proteins such as skin, nails and hair protect the body from environmental hazards • Proteins consist of long chains of organic molecules called amino acids, each amino acid consists five components: o a central carbon atom o a hydrogen atom o an amino group (­NH 2 o a carboxyl group (­COOH) which can release a hydrogen ion to form a carboxyl ion o an R group • peptide: A chain of amino acids linked by peptide bonds.  • peptide bond: A covalent bond between the amino group of one amino acid and the carboxyl group of another.  • polypeptide: A chain of amino acids strung together by peptide bonds; those containing more than 100 peptides are  called proteins. Protein Shape • Proteins have four levels of structural complexity: o Primary Structure: is the sequence of the amino acids along the length of a single polypeptide o Secondary Structure: results from the bonds b/w atoms at different parts of the polypeptide chain. Hydrogen  bonding  alpha­helix or ß­pleated sheets, the form depends on the sequence of amino acids and where the h­ bonding occurs along the chain. o Tertiary Structure: is the complex coiling and folding that gives a protein its final 3D shape, result from  interactions b/w the polypeptide chain and the surrounding water molecules and b/w the R groups of amino  acids in different parts of the molecule. o Quaternar
More Less

Related notes for BIO210Y5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit