Textbook Notes (368,012)
Canada (161,561)
History (78)
HIS101H5 (20)
Chapter 17

HIS Chapter 17.docx

6 Pages
69 Views
Unlock Document

Department
History
Course
HIS101H5
Professor
Mairi Cowan
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 17 (pg. 405­409)  • From europe itself came: wheat, wool, brassware, glass, weapons, tapestries, clocks • NAfrica provides: honey, dates, barley, indigo, ornate metalwork • WAfrica: gold, ivory, musk, parrots, slaves • E Africa: ebony, coral, salt, hemp • India: calico, pepper, ginger, coconut oil, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg • SE Asia: saffron, medicinal herbs • Brazil supplied: sugar, brazilwood, monkeys from the Amazon Iberian Impulse: • Iberian Peninsula, home to Spain and Portugal • Both Iberian and Italian city states searched for an all water route to India, the Spice Islands, China  regions that Europeans called collectively E Indies • Like Mongols, Iberians had a warrior culture, bred by centuries of Reconquisra  • Use technologies adopted from other civilizations such as gunpowder weapons and navigational tools  from Asia • They killed untold thousands through combat, slaughter, spread of infectious diseases gaining wealth  and power by exploiting and enslaving millions • Iberains zealously imposed their faith in the people they ruled • Created new societies that would endure even after their empires were gone Portuguese Overseas Exploration: • Population decline from the Black Death and the famines and epidemics associated with it • Portuguese raiders captured the Moroccan seaport of Ceuta • Also wanted to develop trade relations with African Christians • Henry the Navigator initiates Portuguese expansion • The Ottoman seizure of Constantinople had stunned Christian Europe and disrupted its merchants • Muslims in control of the eastern Mediterranean, the meeting point of three continents and focus of  world trade for centuries • Henry’s expedition gave Portugal a sizeable lead in this search • The land expedition failed to find Prester John but did reach India Columbus’s Enterprise of the Indies: • Experienced mariner and cartographer, Columbus knew earth was round but was wrong about the  size • He was able to make a plausible argument that Europeans could reach E asia by sailing west, across  the Atlanic on voyages that would be shorter and less expensive than going around Africa to the Indies • The journey would be east to west instead of north to south – wind, currents • 1484­ Columbus presented his Enterprise of the Indies­ detailed plan for westward maritime expedition  6o JaoII asked for Portuguese financial support • Columbus sought support from Venice and Genoa • King Isabella of Castile finances Columbus’s gamble • Luis de Santanderhold scolded his sovereign of imagination and offered to finance the Enterprise  himself by loaning funds to Isabella • Castile would have direct route to the Indies than either Portuguese or Islamic Merchants • She sent him with three ships: o Nina o Pinta o Santa Maria • Columbus returned to Spain in 1493 with samples of what he had found, the general conclusion was  the he had landed in unknown part of the world • He mounted three more expeditions in search of Japan, dying in Spain 1506 without ever knowing  what part of the world he reached • Treaty of Tordesillas – an agreement that drew the Line of Demarcation 1675 miles west of the Cape  Verde Islands Voyage of Magellan: • Spanish followed up on Columbus voyages by creating an American Empire – 1  colonizing several  Caribbean islands and later conquering the Aztecs in Mexico and the Inca in Peru • Ferdinand Magellan, a Portuguese mariner­ sailed through what is now called the straits of Magellan THE PORTUGUESE SEABORNE EMPIRE: • Portugal’s new oceanic empire rested on firm foundations: knowledge of currents, winds, coastlines,  superb soling vessels and first rate seamen ship Empire in the Atlantic Ocean: • Vasco da Gama connects Portugal to India • Portuguese sailors bump into Brazil • Brought back brazil wood sample Empire in the Indian and Pacific Oceans: • Portugal build an empire based on commerce • Its superior gunnery, vessels, seamanship held off its occasional Sian enemies • Portuguese seaborne was less an empire than a n network of commercial ports and fortifications  designed not for settlement but for trade • 1505 the first Portuguese viceroy or vice king arrived in India • Albuquerque conquered Gao – Albuquerque’s strategy helps Portugal dominate the Indian Ocean • Portuguese controlled the Persian Gulf form Hormuz and their installation at Melaka dominated the  passage way from the Indian ocean to South China Sea Portugal’s Commercial Empire in 1600: • Refuse to share knowledge • Sold Chinese silk not only in Europe but also in India, the Maluku Islands, Borneo, Timor, Harmuz • Cloth from India, spices from the Malukus, minerals from Borneo, sandalwood from Timor were  distributed throughout the Portuguese • Sailors and merchant carried diseases from one region to another • Marlaria, smallpox, influenza, measles • Building, artistic materials such as rare woods, gems, dyes, metals were shipped from Asia, Africa,  Brazil to Europe • Portuguese commerce connects Asia to Europe THE SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE EMPIRES IN AMERICA: • In Peru, the Inca found ways to neutralize Spain’s mounted cavalry, although they were unable to expel  the invaders, they created an independent Inca kingdom high in the Andes that lasted until 1572 • Brazil was entirely theirs, and they used it to profit from the growing European taste of sugar The Amerind Foundation: • Iberian build empires on existing Amerind societies Sliver Labour: • Spaniards began arriving steadily from the mother country, drawn to the Americans by prospect of  wealth in gold or silver or in sugar production • Expected to use Amerinds labour for mines – wasn’t easy o Smallpox and other European diseases killed large number o Life expectancies decreased o Absence of religion o Catholic missionaries protested against Amerinds slave Government and Administration: • Board of Trade • Americans governed through councils • Authori
More Less

Related notes for HIS101H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit