Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Psychology (1,899)
PSY100Y5 (809)
Dax Urbszat (681)
Chapter 14

Chapter 14 notes.docx

7 Pages
89 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY100Y5
Professor
Dax Urbszat
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 14: Psychological Disorders Abnormal Behavior  1. Medical model applied to Abnormal Behavior • The medical model proposes that it is useful to think of abnormal behavior as a disease  • Thomas Szasz was a critic of this model, he says AB involves deviation from social  norms  • Diagnosis: distinguishing one illness from another  • Etiology: Cause and development history of the illness  • Prognosis: Forecast of what will happen with the illness  2. Criteria of Abnormal behavior     In making diagnoses clinicians rely on a variety of criteria 1. Deviance from social norms 2. Maladaptive Behavior: people may have a psychological disorder because their  everyday adaptive behavior is impaired  3. Personal Distress 3. Stereotypes of Psychological disorders  1. Psychological disorders are incurable  2. People with psychological disorder are often violent and dangerous  3. People with psychological disorders behave in bizarre ways and are very different  from normal people  • David Rosenhan, used ”pseudo patients” to show how even doctors couldn’t judge a  psychological disorder  4. The Classification Of Disorders • “ Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders” • 5 axis  Axis 1: Record most types of disorders Axis 2: Long running personality disorders or intellectual disorders  Axis 3: Physical disorders  Axis 4: Stress experiences within a year Axis 5: current level of adaptive behavior  5. The Prevalence Of Disorders • Epidemiology: The study of the distribution of mental or physical disorders in a  population  • Prevalence: percentage of the population with disorders  Anxiety Disorders  marked by feeling of excessive apprehension and anxiety        They’re a 5 types of anxiety disorders 1. Generalized Anxiety Disorder • Is high level anxiety that is not tied to any specific threat  • Also called “Free Floating anxiety” 2. Phobic Disorder  • Marked by a present and irrational fear of an object or situation that presents no  realistic harm 3. Panic and Agoraphobia  • Panic: Recurrent attacks of overwhelming anxiety that usually occu suddenly  and unexpectedly  • This usually cause a condition called agoraphobia, which is a fear of going to  public places  4. OCD • Marked by persistent thoughts (obsessions) to engage in senseless rituals  (compulsions), ex. Germs: Mysophobia  5. PTD Etiology of Anxiety Disorders  Biological Factors  • Investigators look at Concordance: a concordance rate indicates the percentage  of twin pairs or other pairs of relatives who exhibit the same disorder • Genetics suggest there is a genetic predisposition  • May be link between anxiety disorders and neurochemical activity in the brain,  in specific disturbances to neural circuit using GABA may play a role • Abnormalities in neural circuits using serotonin have recently been implicated  in panic and obsessive compulsive disorders Conditioning and Learning  • Many anxiety may be gained through classical conditioning and maintained  through operant conditioning  • Martin Seligman: Explains this with preparedness, he suggests that people are  biologically prepared by their evolutionary history to acquire fears much more  easily, this would explain why people get more scared of ancient fears (snakes  and spiders) than modern (Outlets or irons) Cognitive Factors • Certain styles of thinking make some people particularly vulnerable to anxiety  disorders  Stress • Anxiety disorders may be stress related Dissociative disorders  disorders in which people lose contact with portions of their  consciousness or memory, resulting in disruption of their sense of self Three dissociative syndromes… 1. Dissociative amnesia: is sudden loss of memory for important personal information  that is too extensive due to normal forgetting (ex. Car accident or home fire) 2. Dissociative Fugue: people lose their memory for their entire lives along with their  sense of personal identity, but remember things unrelated to their identity, such as math  or driving. This overlaps with amnesia  3. Dissociative identity disorder: coexistence of 2 personalities in one body, also called  multiple personality disorder  Mood Disorder:  disorders marked by emotional disturbances of varied kinds that may spill over to  disrupt physical and thought process  2 mood disorders 1. Unipolar: only trouble by depression  2. Bipolar: Both ends of spectrum, going through both depression and manic Major Depressive Disorder: People show persistent feelings of sadness and despair and a  loss of interest in previous sources of pleasure  • Anhedonia: a diminished ability to experience pleasure  • Dysthymic Disorder: chronic depression that is too little to be a major  depressive episode  • Susan Nolen Hoeksema: say woman experience more depression because they  are more likely to face sexual abuse and poverty  Bipolar Disorder  • in manic episode, a person’s mood becomes elevated to the point of euphoria  • Cyclothymic disorder: chronic but only mild symptoms of bipolar disturbance  Diversity in Mood Disorders  • Seasonal affective disorder: type of depression that follows a season pattern,  therapy may include photo therapy where light is shown  • Postpartum depression: depression that occurs after child birth  • Bipolar yields higher suicide rate than depression and woman attempt more  suicides but men are usually more successful  Etiology of Mood Disorders (cause)  Genetic Vulnerability  • Genetic factors are involved through twi
More Less

Related notes for PSY100Y5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit