Textbook Notes (368,125)
Canada (161,663)
Psychology (1,899)
PSY270H5 (93)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2 Notes.doc

8 Pages
98 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSY270H5
Professor
Peter Morrow
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 2: Cognitive Neuroscience Cognitive neuroscience: the study of the physiological basis of cognition Neurons: the building blocks and transmission lines of the nervous system Neurons: The Building Blocks of the Nervous System The Microstructure of the Brain: Neurons  The nature of electrical signals in the brain & pathways had just begun being discovered in the  19  century.  Nerve net: a network believed to be continuous  Camillo Golgi, in the 1870s developed a staining technique which involved immersing a thin  slice of brain tissue in a solution of silver nitrate.  Ramon y Cajal, a Spanish physiologist discovered neurons (the basic building blocks of the  brain) which became the centerpiece of the neuron doctrine. Concepts introduced by Cajal  include: neurons, synapses, and neural circuits (basic principles used today to explain how the  brain creates cognitions).  Neuron doctrine: the idea that individual cells transmit signals in the nervous system, and  that these cells are not continuous with other cells as proposed by nerve net theory.  The cell body contains mechanisms to keep the cell alive.  Dendrites branch out from the cell body to receive signals from other neurons.  Axon/Nerve fiber transmits signals to other neurons.  Receptors: neurons similar to brain neurons cause they have a cell body and axon, but  have specialized receptors that pick up information from the environment (Cajal).  Synapse: the small gap between the end of the neuron’s axon and the dendrites or cell body  of another neuron.  Neural circuits: a circuit which consists of the connection of many neurons. The Signals That Travel in Neurons  Determining the actual nature of signals transmitted from neurons awaited the development of  electronic amplifiers, powerful enough to make the extremely small electrical signals generated  by the neuron visible.  In the 1920s, Edgar Adrian recorded electrical signals from single sensory neurons, getting the  Nobel Prize in 1932 as a result. Method: Recording From a Neuron  Microelectrodes used by Adrian recorded electrical signals from single neurons using ­  small shafts of hallow glass filled w/ a conductive salt solution that can pick up electrical signals  at the electrode tip and conduct these signals back to a recording device.  The recording electrode is connected to a recording device and to another electrode  called the reference electrode.  The reference electrode: is located outside of the tissue (figure 2.5a)  Nerve impulse/action potential: an electrical signal transmitted down the axon.  Neurotransmitter: a chemical that makes it possible for action potentials to be transmitted  across the synaptic gap which separates the end of the axon from the dendrite or cell body of  another neuron.  Adrian studied the relation between nerve firing and sensory experience by measuring how the  firing of a neuron from a receptor in the skin changed as he applied more pressure to the skin.  Therefore increased stimulus intensity causes an increase in the rate of nerve firing.  Localization of function: a principle stating that neurons serving different cognitive  functions transmit signals to different areas of the brain. Localization of Function  Localization of function: one of the basic principles of brain organization.  Cerebral cortex: serves most cognitive function, it is a layer of tissue about 3 mm thick  covering the brain. Localization for Perception  Primary receiving areas (for the senses): (see figure 2.7) vision = occipital lobe; skin  senses = parietal lobe (dotted area); hearing  = temporal lobe (located within temporal lobe).  The frontal lobe responds to all senses and is involved in higher cognitive functioning.  Temporal lobe: neurons in this lobe respond to sound, and neurons in another area in the  temporal lobe to faces.  Occipital lobe: occupied by the primary receiving area, neurons in the occipital lobe  respond to stimulation of the eye with light.  Parietal lobe: the area for the skin senses ­ touch, temperature, and pain.  Areas of taste and smell are located on the underside of the temporal lobe (smell) and in a  small area within the frontal lobe (taste).  Frontal lobe: receives signals from all of the senses and plays an important role in  perceptions involving the coordination of information received through two or more senses.  Prosopagnosia: inability to recognize faces resulting from damage to a certain area of the  temporal lobe on the lower right side of the brain (not the auditory area, which is higher up in  the temporal lobe).  Method: Brain Imaging Brain imaging: used for measuring brain activity in humans allowing researchers to create  images showing which areas of the brain are activated as awake humans carry out various  cognitive tasks. Positron emission tomography (PET): a brain imaging technique that takes advantage  of the fact that blood flow increases in areas of the brain that are activated by a cognitive task. To  measure blood flow, a low dose of a radioactive tracer is injected into a person’s bloodstream.  The  brain is then scanned by the PET apparatus, measuring the signal from the tracer at each location  in the brain (figure 2.8). Subtraction technique (figure 2.9): Brain activity is measured first in a “control state,” before  stimulation is presented, and again while the stimulus is presented.  Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI): fMRI is based on the measurement  of blood flow. An advantage of fMRI is that blood flow can be measured without radioactive tracers.  fMRI takes advantage of the fact that haemoglobin, which carries oxygen in the blood, contains a  ferrous (iron) molecule and therefore has magnetic properties. If a magnetic field is presented to  the brain, the hemoglobin molecules line up, like tiny magnets. fMRI indicates the presence of brain  activity because the hemoglobin molecules in areas of high brain activity lose some of the oxygen  they are transporting.  This makes the hemoglobin more magnetic, so these molecules respond  more strongly to the magnetic field. The fMRI apparatus determines the relative activity of various  areas of the brain by detecting changes in the magnetic response of the hemoglobin.  The  subtraction technique is also used for fMRI. FMRI is the main method for determining which areas  of the brain are activated by different cognitive functions because it doesn‘t require radioactive  tracers. Fusiform face area (FFA): the fusiform gyrus on the underside of the temporal lobe,  corresponds to the area usually damaged in patients with prosopagnosia. Parahippocampal place area (PPA): activated by pictures representing indoor and  outdoor scenes.  The important part of this area is information about aptial layout, because  increased activation occurs when viewing pictures both of empty room and of rooms that are  completely furnished. Extrastriate body area (EBA): activated by pictures of bodies and parts of bodies (but not  by faces).  Modularity is often used to refer to localization. Module: an area specialized for a specific function. The fusiform face area, extra striate body area, and parahippocampal place area are modules for  perceiving faces, bodies, and palces, respectively. Localization for Language  Broca’s area: area in the frontal lobe that is specialized in producing language.  Broca’s aphasia: having difficulty in speech after suffering a stroke but can still  understand the speech of others. Those w/ Broca’s aphasia have difficulty processing  connecting words such as “was” and “by”.  Wernicke’s area: area of the temporal lobe that specializes in speech.  Wernicke’s aphasia: producing meaningless speech and unable to understand speech  and writing.  The results of many behavioural and physiological experiments have caused some researchers  to distinguish not between problems of production and understanding, but between  problems of form and meaning.  Method: Event­Related Potential Event­related potential (ERP): recorded with small disc electrodes placed on a person’s  scalp. Each electrode picks up signals from groups of neurons that fire together. A disadvantage of  the ERP is that it is difficult to pinpoint where the response is originating in the brain.  ERP is suited  for studying dynamic processes like language. The ERP is useful in distinguishing between form  and meaning because the ERP consists of a number of waves that occur at different delays after a  stimulus is presented and that can be linked to different functions.  Two components responding to  different aspects of language are the N400 component and the P600 component, where N stands  for “negative” (note the negative is up in ERP record) and P for “positive.” (see figure 2.14) The  N400 wave of the ERP is affected by the meaning of the word and the P600 wave of the ERP is  affected by grammar. In conclusion: 1. Specific language functions are localized in specific brain areas, so that localization of function  is an important part of language processing; and 2. Language processing is distributed over a large area of the brain. Distributed Processing in the Brain Distributed processing: specific functions being processed by many different areas in the  brain (figure 2.15 & 2.16). Memory, language, making decisions, and solving problems, all involve distributed activity in the  brain. Multiple areas in
More Less

Related notes for PSY270H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit