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Lemert 307-312.docx

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Department
Sociology
Course Code
SOC232H5
Professor
Erik Schneiderhan

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Manifest and Latent Functions Robert K. Merton- pages 307-312  Merton sought to establish postwar sociology on a scientific basis  Hawthorne Western Electric study that Merton mentions results showing efficiency increased mostly by latent factors that were totally unexpected when the study began  Distinction between manifest and latent functions devised to stop unintended confusion between conscious motivations for social behavior and its objective consequences  Confusing motives with functions  George Herbert Mead- “attitude of hostility toward law-breaker has unique advantage of uniting all members of community in emotional solidarity of aggression” (pg 308)  Emile Durkheim- similar analysis of social functions of punishment focused on latent functions (consequences for community) rather than manifest functions (consequences for criminal)  Categories of subjective nature and categories of generally unrecognized by objective functional consequences  Manifest functions- objective consequences for specified unit which contribute to its adjustment or adaptation and were intended  Latent functions- unintended and unrecognized consequences of
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