Chapter 6

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Published on 19 Jul 2011
School
UTM
Department
Sociology
Course
SOC244H5
Chapter 6: Patriarchial Relations of Production in 19th century
Ontario: Marjorie Griffin Cohen (Pages 85-96)
Introduction
In the 19th century, couples in Ontario built and sustained their families by mutual
dependence and complementary responsibilities of the husband and wife
In regards to property relations, Ontario was very similar to England in that women were
regarded very differently than men
This chapter derived from Womens Work, Markets, and Economic Development in
Nineteenth-century Ontario, argues thatgender relations characterizing family farms in
pre-industrial Ontario were patriarchal (85)
Patriarchal Relations of Production in 19th century Ontario- Cohen
patriarchal productive relations can be defined as the organization of labour in which
males, as husbands, fathers, and even sons and brothers, have power over the productive
activities of their children, wives, and sometimes their sisters and mothers (85)
Patriarchy
The most important source of labour power in agricultural sector was the non-wages
labour of family members
Patriarchy: system of society or government in which men hold the power and women are
largely excluded from it.
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issue of ownership and control of labour is important in the family economy as well as the
capitalist economies
principles of organization of labour within society based on who does and who doesnt
own the means of production
oownership implies possession but also the social institutions developed to
recognize property rights
property relations recognized by society most evident in laws which protect property
relations
issue of ownership extends outside the legal realm since all social standards, customs and
the entire complex of human relations are influenced by this
importance of who owns the property throughout the development process outlined by
Oscar Lange, “it is the ownership of the means of production which decides the ways in
which they are used and which thereby determines the forms taken by co-operation and
the division of labour. Moreover the ownership of the means of production determines the
issue of who owns the products, hence decides how they are distributed (85)
usual analysis of class relations deals with those identified through market activity; class
interests evident when owners are employers and workers receive wages
oif there is no wages labour, the ownership usually treated as being vested in group
which performs the work (family)
Family Economy: used to denote the basic structure of production and consumption in the
preindustrial Europe. In the family economy there were regional variations, which were how different
places were different in family economy.
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accumulation of capital is not anyones surplus labour but rather assumed the group
shares in ownership
family in 19th century Ontario was not egalitarian and family per se wasnt considered the
means of production
only in some cases women owned means of production
property was generally owned by male head of the family
wives and children were the proletariat [Workers or working-class people, regarded
collectively (often used with reference to Marxism)] of the family farm, their labour was
rewarded according the good fortune of goodwill of the owner
significance of male control over female labour been obscured due to conjugal
relationship, mutual dependence, and their shared standard of living, but still female
labour not in a position of equality with male labour in the family economy where the
ownership and control of property belonged to the male
important point to note is that question of power through property relations in general was
not unique to capitalist relations, but is crucial in understanding productive relations
within the family economy as well
male control over labour established through power of ownership
in the family economy the issue of power was complicated by the personal relationships
of the family and the fact that the male head of the family was clearly part of the
labouring unit
ohowever, his position was different from the others; all surplus produced by the
non-wages workers who didnt share in ownership was given to the owner
oall accumulation of capital occurred was legally his
non-wages family workers had certain rights with respect to their membership in the
family; children and wives could claim support from their fathers or husbands but they
had no legal rights to what they product through their labour even though the contribution
of family members was critical to the success or failure of the economy of the family unit
while male and female children and wives were all labours subject to the authority of the
male owner of the means of production, there were important different in the duration and
extent of patriarchal dominance
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Document Summary

Chapter 6: patriarchial relations of production in 19th century. Patriarchy: system of society or government in which men hold the power and women are largely excluded from it. In the 19th century, couples in ontario built and sustained their families by mutual dependence and complementary responsibilities of the husband and wife. In regards to property relations, ontario was very similar to england in that women were regarded very differently than men: this chapter derived from women"s work, markets, and economic development in. Nineteenth-century ontario, argues that gender relations characterizing family farms in pre-industrial ontario were patriarchal (85) Patriarchal relations of production in 19th century ontario- cohen. Patriarchal productive relations can be defined as the organization of labour in which males, as husbands, fathers, and even sons and brothers, have power over the productive activities of their children, wives, and sometimes their sisters and mothers (85)