Textbook Notes (367,758)
Canada (161,374)
Sociology (1,508)
SOC263H5 (63)
Chapter 1&2

Chapter 1&2 - Notes .docx

10 Pages
179 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC263H5
Professor
Anna Korteweg
Semester
Fall

Description
SOC263 Notes on Chapters 1&2/Test Review Pg. 6,8,23,24,29,31,33,36,  Inequality is not caused by innate personality flaws People are poor because opportunities are distributed differentially in society on the basis of things such as  class, age, gender, ethnicity and race  Social Inequality: long­lasting differences among individuals or groups of people that have implications for  individual lives, especially ‘for the rights or opportunities they exercise and the rewards or privileges they  enjoy’  Ex: compared to people from middle and upper classes, the working class do not have the same  educational opportunities and tend to have worse health  Structures of inequality: patterns of advantages and disadvantages that are durable but penetrable (allow  things to pass through) Social time: issues of generation and the life course (inequality is understood as a dynamic process that  evolves throughout one’s life and is influenced by the generation in which one is born)  To understand social inequality we need: social structure. Human agency and social time Social structure: long­lasting, patterned relationships among the elements of society  Talcott Parsons – structural functionalists conceive society as an all­encompassing social structure that may  be decomposed into several specialized substructures (ex. The economic, the political, and the educational  systems of society) Roles: building blocks of institutions, which are in turn the building blocks of society  Stratification: rungs, classifications, where people stand in comparison to other people Hierarchy: classes  Class relations: relative rights and powers that people have in production processes (significance, they  produce patterned systems of inequality and conflict is embedded in class relations)      Social Relations are characterized by power that are fundamental structures or organizing features of social  life. (sets of social relations: class, age, gender, ethnicity and race) Power relations: determined by the ability of individuals in social relationships to impose their will on other  regardless of resistance  Conceptualizing social relations characterized by power suggests that conflict is present more often than  consensus in these sets of relations  Agency: individuals do not passively conform to the circumstances of their lives, they are active participants  in social relationships (sometimes rebel and sometimes choose to follow the crowd)  Social time: life course and generation issues             Generation: people are born into groups that have meaningful significance because of the social­political  culture of a given time in a given place (ex. People born between 1910 and 1915 were coming of age during  the depression ▯ their lives were shaped by that experience)  Stratification theory Structural functionalism Marx Capitalism – division of society into two central classes  Petite Bourgeoisie – those who own the products of their labour and who do not exploit the labour power of  others. Members of the petit bourgeoisie are self­employed and are also referred to as the  old middle  class. Exploitation – where bourgeoisie take advantage of the proletariat  Labour power – capacity to work, the only  real power the proletariat has under the capitalism is the power  to choose whether to work  3 classes of modern capitalist society  1. Owners of Labour Power   2. Owners of Capital 3. Landowners   What makes these three social classes so great? People derive their income from the use of their labour  power, capital or landed property  Marx believed: Society is divided into classes that are defined by their relationship to the principal means of  production in society  Capitalism ▯ bourgeoisie exploit the proletariat, who have no choice but to sell their labour power to the  bourgeoisie in order to survive  Emphasis in Marx’ work: relationships between those who appropriate the labour of others to make a profit  and those who need to sell their labour power   2 Themes emerge from Marx’s work: 1. Social class is based in productive relations  2. Social class is conceptualized in relational terms   Neo­Marxism – extend the Marxist theory  Erik Olin Wright  3 principles forming the basis of class exploitation: 1. Inverse interdependence principle – material welfare of one group of people causally depends upon  the material deprivations of another  2. Exclusion principle – inverse interdependence depends upon the exclusion of the exploited from  access to certain productive resources 3. Appropriation Principle – exclusion generates material advantage to exploiters because it enables  them to appropriate the labor effort of the exploited  Class exploitation involves social interaction and that this interaction is structured by sets of productive  social relations that serve to bind exploiter and exploited together  Authority (dominance) and Skill (wage)  Figure 2.1 (page 23) Refers to class locations within the capitalist class structure  Cells represent class locations within an overriding framework of class relations  Regardless of what cell and employee is in, an exploitative, class­based relation exists between that  employee and the employer    Weber  Classes are groups of people who share a common class situation Class situation: typical chances of material provision, external position, and personal destiny in life which  depend on the degree and nature of the power, or lack of power, to dispose of goods or qualifications for  employment and the ways in which, within a given economic order, such goods or qualifications for  employment can be utilized as a source of income or revenue  3 types of classes: 1. Property classes ­  property ownership determine class sit. 2. Income classes – the chances of utilizing goods or services on the market  determines class sit. 3. Social classes – combination of the class sit. Created by property and income  4 Main social classes: 1. The working class 2. The petite bourgeoisie 3. Propertyless intellectuals, technicians, commercial workers  4. Classes privileged by the property or education  Emphasis on the distributions of resources  Parties (voluntary associations that organize for the collective pursuit of interests, such as political parties  or lobbying group
More Less

Related notes for SOC263H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit