Textbook Notes (368,696)
Canada (162,081)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC263H5 (63)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3: Gender - Notes.docx

6 Pages
120 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC263H5
Professor
Anna Korteweg
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 3 ­ Gender and Inequality Introduction • Beth – Mother of 7 children who worked the night shift and did the household  duties during the day while her husband who worked the dayshift and spent  his free time at the pub. She barely got any sleep and didn’t have the energy to  even think it wasn’t fair   o Demonstrates gendered disadvantage in labour markets  • Women are disproportionately responsible for household labour, child care  and emotion management in families and for caring for older relatives  Explanations of Gender­Based Inequality • Gender:  o Introduced in sociology as a way of avoiding biological essentialist  views that were associated with the term sex o Used to express the view that there is nothing innate about men or  women that makes one sex more suitable for performing a particular  task than another   o Refers to the social construction of difference that is largely organized  around biological sex • Essentialist perspectives reinforced beliefs that biological differences between  men and women determine their disparate positions in society • Feminist sociologists identified that it is difficult, if not impossible, to address  structural aspects of gender through empirical research  • Women and men have different experiences in most institutions o Example: labour markets are structured that women have fewer  opportunities for promotion than men  • Patterns of gender, in turn, are made obvious through human interaction in our  productive, reproductive, and distributive activities  • Gender involves identity, power, exploitation, and oppression  Social Relations of Reproduction: Patriarchy as a System of Domination • Radical feminists: Branch of feminism that places emphasis on the relations  of reproduction and the disadvantages that women face as a result of how  reproduction is organized in society. Traditionally, this branch of feminism  tended to reduce explanations of women’s inequality to their capacity to give  birth o Assume that gender inequality is a function of men’s control of  women’s reproduction and sexuality  o Suggest that gender inequality is distinct from other forms of  oppression, that sex­based inequality is the original and most basic  form of oppression, and that the dominance of women by men is  universal  • According to Shulamith Firestone Women’s subordinate position in relation to  men is rooted in the human biological family  ▯characterized by four universal  features 1. Women’s biological capacity to reproduce made them dependent on  men for their survival  2. Children take a long time to become independent compared to the  young of other species 3. Bonds between mothers and children are universal, these bonds  determine the psychology of all women and children 4. The reproductive biological capacity of women led to the first  categorical division of labour  • These characteristics of biological families and the sexes lead to a  power imbalance between men and women that needs to be overcome  • Mary O’brien also argues that the root of women’s oppression lies in their  biology  ▯she suggests that the reproduction process is dialectical and has  changed throughout history   • Gendered ideologies of love, sexuality and motherhood perpetuate gender  inequality by keeping women unaware of their subordinate status • The most important criticism made by radical feminists is that gender  inequality treats the system of male dominance or patriarchy as a universal,  trans­historical and trans­cultural phenomena; women were everywhere  oppressed by men in more or less the same ways  • Patriarchy leads to assessments of men having an ‘innate desire for power’ • Problem with radical feminist thought: limited focus on the procreative aspect  of social reproduction  • Social reproduction is work and how it is divided is critical to social  organization   Social Relations of Production and Reproduction: Capitalism and Patriarchy as  Intersecting Systems of Dominance  • Social­feminist consider the relations of production and reproduction in their  work  • Socialist feminism has united the relations of production and reproduction by  linking the systems of patriarchy and capitalism in an integrated theory   • Dual system theorists suggest that patriarchy and capitalism are 2 distinct  systems that intersect in relation to the oppression of women  • Heidi Hartmann  ▯defines patriarchy as a ‘set of social relations between  men, which have a material base and which, though hierarchical, establish or  create inter­dependence and solidarity among men that enable them to  dominate women’. She suggest that the material base of patriarchy is the  control on women’s labour power by men o Capitalism is not an ‘all­powerful’ system of inequality; rather it is  responsive and flexible to contradictions that stem from patriarchy  o The family wage is still institutionalized in capitalism because men  continue to be primarily responsible for earning a living, women  remain primarily responsible for maintaining families and women earn  lower wages in labour markets than men do  o Marxist analyses of women’s oppression are flawed because they do  not fully acknowledge the strength of patriarchy in maintaining a  system of disadvantage for women • Slvia Walby defined patriarchy as ‘a system of social structures and practices  in which men dominate, oppress and exploit women o Walby argues that to understand the structural nature of patriarchy it  should be considered at different levels of analysis:  Patriarchy is a system of social relations that exists alongside  capitalism and racism   6 patriarchal structures: • Patriarchal mode of production (household production) • Patriarchal relations in paid work • Patriarchal states • Male violence  • Patriarchal relations in sexuality  • Patriarchal culture   In each patriarchal structures, patriarchal practices establish or  reinforce systems of patriarchy  • Defines patriarchal structures ‘in terms of the social  relations in each structure’; these structures ‘represent  the most significant constellations of social relations  which structure gender relations’  • Problem: She does not define what is meant  ‘constellations of social relations’ o Mainly concerned with patriarchy and capitalism  o She favors a dual­ or plural­system theoretical approach   In Dual­system theories, the roots of patriarchy are generally  thought to be located within the reproductive sphere of the  family, whereas the roots of the political­economic system are  located in the mode of production • Walby argues that patriarchy infiltrates both 
More Less

Related notes for SOC263H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit