Textbook Notes (368,425)
Canada (161,877)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC263H5 (63)
Chapter 3

Chapter 3 soc.docx

6 Pages
160 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC263H5
Professor
Anna Korteweg
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 3  Gender and Inequality  Gender The term gender was introduced in sociology as a way of avoiding biological essentialist  views that were associated with the term sex.  Gender, on the other hand, was used to  express the view that there is nothing innate about men or women that makes one sex  more suitable for performing a particular task than another. Gender refers to the social  construction of difference that is largely organized around biological sex. • To suggest that gender is a social structure is to see gender as a central organizing  feature of social life • Gender relations are historically variable, cultural, ideological, biological, sexual,  political, and material • Gender involves identity, power, exploitation (treating people unfairly) and  oppression (unjust) • Gender affects almost every aspect of social life and is often the basis of  differential access to resources and power in Canada and in other western  societies. • Research on families and unpaid labor shows that women are disproportionately  responsible for household labors, childcare, and emotion management in families  and for caring for older relatives • Compared to women, men tend to be concentrated in industries, labor markets,  occupations, and jobs that are characterized by higher salaries, more benefits,  greater autonomy, and higher status • Gender inequality is often grounded in the relations of social reproduction and  sexuality. Social Relations of Reproduction: Patriarchy as a System of Domination Radical Feminists: Assumes that gender inequality is a function of men’s control of  women’s reproduction and sexuality. This produces an unequal power relationship that  determines the sexual division of labor; it is perpetuated by the nuclear family and makes  women economically dependent on men. Since radical feminist suggest that gender  inequality is distinct from other forms of oppression, that sex­based inequality is the  original and most basic form of oppression the dominance of women by men is universal. Radical feminist thought tends to neglect the relationship between gender and the  processes of production Radical feminist most often discuss patriarchy in relation to women’s domestic  responsibilities, their reproductive capacity or heterosexuality Shulamith Firestone According to shulamith firestone women’s subordinate position in relation to men is  rooted in the human biological family  Biological family Characterized by four universal features 1) Women’s biological capacity to reproduce made them dependent on men for their  survival  2) Children take a long time to become independent compared to the young of other  species 3) Bonds between mother and children are universal, and these bonds determine the  psychology of all women and children  4) The reproductive biological capacity of women led to the first categorical division  of labor Mary O’ Brien She also argues that the root of women’s oppression lies in their biology, but unlike  Firestone, she suggests that the reproduction process is dialectical and has changed  through out history. Men need to control reproduction because unlike women they are  alienated from their seed of reproduction through the act of sexual intercourse. To  compensate for this alienation, men seek to control women through patriarchal order Furthermore, gendered ideologies of love, sexuality, and motherhood maintain gender  inequality by keeping women unaware of their subordinate status Hartmann: Defines patriarchy as a set of social relations between men, which have a  material base and establish or create inter dependence and solidarity among men that  enable them to dominate women. According to her Capitalism is not an all­powerful  system of inequality; rather it is responsive and flexible to contradictions that stem from  patriarchy. She argues that men control women by restricting their economic and sexual  activity. Women work for men by raising his children and doing his housework. Walby: in order to understand nature of patriarchy, Walby argues that it should be  considered at different levels of analysis. Most abstractly, patriarchy is a system of social  relations that exists alongside capitalism and racism. She also argues that there are 6  patriarchal structures 1) The patriarchal mood of production 2) Patriarchal relations in paid work 3) Patriarchal states 4) Male violence 5) Patriarchal relations in sexuality 6) Patriarchal culture And in conclusion she argues that patriarchy is an important concept for understanding  gender inequality. Combining the Relations of production and distribution The relations of distribution are sequences of linked actions through which people share  the necessities of survival (Aker). According to her gender relations of distribution in  capitalist society are rooted in history and are transformed as the means of production.  She suggests that the wage, which is rooted in the relations of production, is the essential  component of distribution in capitalist society. Martial relations, personal relations, and state relations are the gendered process through  which distribution occurs. Personal Relations: personal relations of distributions are held together by emotional  bonds, usually between blood relatives, and are dependent upon the wage. Martial Relations: Martial relations are the central component of distributions for  married women who do not work for pay and are thus dependent upon their husbands for  their wage State Relations of distribution: is the final type of distribution arrangement that Aker  considers. This is based on laws are governmental policies that have historically been  developed in gendered ways. For Aker these shape social class Doing Gender issues of agency and identity West and Zimmerman argue that to understand gender, a distinction needs to be made  between sex, sex category, and gender. Sex refers to the biological criteria that are widely accepted in society to signify whether  one is a man or a woman. Sex category is defined as the socially required identificatory displays that help to  determine whether one is a man or a woman Gender is the activity of managing situated conduct in light of normative conceptions of  attitude and activities appropriate for one’s sex category  Symbolic Interactionism, West and Zimmerman also argue that gender inequality is  realized and socially constructed through our daily activities in interaction with others. It  is through social construction that we develop gendered identities (masculinity and  femininity) that come to be seen as ‘natural’. Rismans’s Structure Framework Gender as a structure  Individaul level of  Interactional level of  Institutional level of analysis:  analysis: Socialization;  analysis: Distributional of material  identities  Cultural expectations;  advantage taken for granted  situational meaning Formal organizational  schemas; Ideological discourse A relational understanding of gender focuses on how oppression is implicated in relations  among women, among men, and be
More Less

Related notes for SOC263H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit