Textbook Notes (368,611)
Canada (162,009)
Sociology (1,513)
SOC362H5 (1)
Chapter

Gender, time and inequality: Trends in women’s and men’s paid work, unpaid work and free time .docx

5 Pages
162 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC362H5
Professor
Lina Samuel
Semester
Winter

Description
Gender, Time and Inequality: trends in women’s and men’s paid work, unpaid work  and free time Liana Sayer • Analysis uses nationally representative time diary data from 1965, 1975 and 1998  to examine trends and gender differences in time use • Women continue to do more household work than men • Men have increased time in core household activities (i.e. cooking, cleaning and  child care) • 30 minute a day free­time gap has emerged • Women and men appear to be selectively investing unpaid work time in tasks that  construct family life while spending less time in routine tasks (suggesting  symbolic meaning of unpaid work might be shifting) • Access to free time emerged as area of time inequality • Economic, demographic and normative shifts point in direction of more similar  time allocation patterns for men and women as opposed to 40 years ago • Widespread entry of women in market work since 60s challenged presumption  that women’s primary adult role is that of caretaker of home and family • Erosion of wages for men over past 25 years challenged ability of men to be sole  family earners • Demographic trends of delayed marriage and reduced fertility meant that men and  women remaining single longer and spending smaller proportion of their prime  working years caring for young children • Norms governing appropriate adult roles for men and women changed with  increased acceptance of married women in paid workforce and involvement of  men in family life • 2 competing claims about changing gender differences in time use: o Contentions that men’s and women’s paid and unpaid work time is  converging because men are doing less paid and more unpaid work and  women doing less unpaid and more paid work o Men have increased unpaid work time only slightly while women have  increased paid work time substantially­ women doing second shift and  thus have less leisure time  • Competing interpretations of how much men have altered time allocations and  implication shifts in time use have for gender equality • Convergence proponents emphasize how much women and men have altered paid  and unpaid work allocations and argue that further convergence will occur  because of continued change among individuals as well as replacement of cohorts  characterized by gender­specialized time patterns with cohorts characterized by  less gender­specialized time use • Second shift proponents juxtapose women’s rapid movement into paid work  against intransigent low level of men’s unpaid work and conclude that gender  revolution is incomplete • Women’s movement into paid work not led to redistribution of household labour  between men and women because women’s performance and men’s avoidance of  unpaid work remain potent daily enactments of unequal gender relations • Large body of literature examines trends in paid work or trends in housework, but  little research has examined gender differences in child care or leisure time, and  even less has examined time in all activities • We know relatively little about how gender differences in all types of unpaid work  as well as free time might have changed during period of rapid growth in  women’s market roles and vocal criticism of the gender division of household  labour • If men’s unpaid work has increased significantly while women’s has declined, the  historic pattern in which gendered time has perpetuated men’s greater structural  and interpersonal power may also be changing • Contribution of this research is to investigate with new empirical data whether the  relationship between time use and gender ahs changed • To address whether women’s and men’s time use patterns have become more  similar and why • Extends   previous   research   by   examining   trends   and  gender   differences   in  allocation of time to paid work, all types of unpaid work and leisure, rather than  focusing on just one domain Time use and gender inequality • Two   theoretical   explanations   of   gender   differences­   economic/bargaining  perspective and the gender perspective • Economic/bargaining perspective: o Emphasizes  rationality   and  relative   resource   levels   and  the  reasons  women’s and men’s time allocations should have changed in response to  shifting economic, demographic and normative conditions o Women’s   rising   educational   attainment   and   wages   reduced   their  comparative advantage in unpaid work at the same time that declines in  rates of marriage, increase in age at first marriage and declines in fertility  have reduced unpaid work demands o Women should be reallocating increasing amounts of time from unpaid to  paid work o Because increases in women’s education, employment and earnings have  strengthened, their bargaining power, men’s unpaid work time should also  be increasing • Gender perspective: o Emphasizes resiliency of gender inequality and elements that work against  change in gender division o labour o Unpaid work not a gender­neutral bundle of chores that women perform  out of comparative advantage or lower resources but instead integral to the  reproduction of unequal power relations between men and women o Not doing unpaid work, or at least avoiding certain activities, is one way  men display masculinity and reinforce their structural and cultural power o Perspective predicts that sharply differentiated gendered time use patens  may have been fine­tuned to reflect changing demographics, economics,  and norms but the recreation of gender inequality continues to be a  fundamental product of gendered time allocations • Definitions of acceptable feminine behaviour broadened to include wage earning • Women’s performance of domestic labour still part of being a good wife and  mother • More acceptable for women to adopt masculine behaviours such as doing paid  women that for men to adopt feminine behaviours like doing unpaid work • Consequently,   women   s
More Less

Related notes for SOC362H5

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit