Textbook Notes (378,682)
CA (167,218)
UTSC (19,212)
Anthropology (537)
ANTB14H3 (34)
Chapter 6

Chapter 6

3 Pages
77 Views

Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTB14H3
Professor
Michael Schillaci

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Chapter 6: Primate Mating Systems
Week 5
Darwin- complex adaptations exist because they involved step by step by natural selection
Mating systems- way animals find mated and care for offspring
oPlay a crucial role in understanding of primate societies
Understanding diverse reproductive strategies of nonhuman primates illuminates human
evolution because we share many elements of our reproductive physiology with other species of
primates
The language of adaptive explanations
Evolutionary biology-strategy: behavioural mechanisms that lead to particular courses of
behaviour in particular functional contexts, such as foraging/reproduction
oProduct of natural selection acting on individuals to shape motivations, reactions,
preferences, capacities and choices that influence behaviours
oStrategies that led to greater reproductive success in ancestral populations have been
favoured by natural selection and represent adaptations
Cost and benefit: effect of particular behavioural strategies on reproductive success
The evolution of reproductive strategies
Primate females always provide lots of care for their young, but males do so in only few species
Males do not care for their offspring:
1.When they can easily use their resources to acquire many additional matings or
2.When caring for their offspring would not appreciably increase the offsprings fitness
Natural selection will favour individuals that allocate effort among these competing demands so as
to maximize number of surviving offspring that they produce
Because time, energy and resources are always limited, males that devote more effort to caring for
offspring must allocate less effort to competing for access to females
Unequal parental investment will be favoured when one or both of following are true:
1.Acquiring additional mates is relatively easy, so considerable gains are achieved by
allocating additional effort to attracting mates
2.Fitness of offspring raised by only one parent is high, so payoff for additional parental
investment is relatively low
Mammalian reproductive system commits primate females to investing in their offspring
In primates and other mammals, selection tends to favour low male investment because females
lactate and males dont
Reproductive strategies of females
Female primates invest heavily in each of their offspring
In some species, offspring may weigh as much as 30% of mothers body weight at time of weaning
Females reproductive success depends on ability to obtain enough resources to support herself and
offspring
Very young and very old females do not reproduce as successfully as middle aged females
Relatively low fertility and high infant mortality of young females reflect the fact that when female
monkeys and apes begin to reproduce, they are not yet fully grown
Important differences between reproductive termination in monkeys and apes and menopause in
humans:
1.There is gradual decline in fertility with age in other primates.
Humans, there is abrupt and complete cessation of reproduction at about 50 yrs of age
2.Relatively few primates live to age of reproductive termination.
Human, menopause occurs about midway through maximum human life span
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Chapter 6: Primate Mating Systems Week 5 Darwin- complex adaptations exist because they involved step by step by natural selection Mating systems- way animals find mated and care for offspring o Play a crucial role in understanding of primate societies Understanding diverse reproductive strategies of nonhuman primates illuminates human evolution because we share many elements of our reproductive physiology with other species of primates The language of adaptive explanations Evolutionary biology-strategy: behavioural mechanisms that lead to particular courses of behaviour in particular functional contexts, such as foragingreproduction o Product of natural selection acting on individuals to shape motivations, reactions, preferences, capacities and choices that influence behaviours o Strategies that led to greater reproductive success in ancestral populations have been favoured by natural selection and represent adaptations Cost and benefit: effect of particular behavioural strategies on reproductive success The evolution of reproductive strategies Primate females always provide lots of care for their young, but males do so in only few species Males do not care for their offspring: 1. When they can easily use their resources to acquire many additional matings or 2. When caring for their offspring would not appreciably increase the offsprings fitness Natural selection will favour individuals that allocate effort among these competing demands so as to maximize number of surviving offspring that they produce Because time, energy and resources are always limited, males that devote more effort to caring for o
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit