The Beginning.pdf

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Department
Art History
Course
VPHB52H3
Professor
Roger Mc Cleary
Semester
Fall

Description
Painting On Pottery: The Beginning 2012-09-25 7:58 PM READING ANNOTATIONS “Painting on Pottery: The Beginning” – pg.39-43 • Decorating pot is very different from painting on a flat surface • The profile can sometimes look strangely irregular • The Greeks did not use the contour of a pot as a frame, but skillfully adjusted their designs to the vessels they were painting on th • Amphora showing mourners around a bier, mid -8 century BC, National Archaeological Museum, Athens o Though it is huge (155cm high), the designs on it are small o There are horizontal lines, each wit h patterns inside designed to be either vertical or horizontal. This gives the impression of a stable and monumental appearance and contrasts with its curving contour o Human figures appear in only one VIP section: the panel between two handles o Slim stick-figure silhouettes represents mourners around a bier  pottery was used as a grave marker th • Pottery was briefly used as monuments, but by the end of the century BC, stone slabs (stelai or stele singular) or round statues (kouroi) were used as grave markers, and pottery went back to functionary as the useful craft it used to function as “How Greek Pottery Was Used” • Greeks made pots with painted decoration for 4 main purposes: o As containers/storage jars with ample capacity in which wine, water, olive oil, o r dry goods were kept  A pot with two handles is called an amphora  A pot with three handles (used for water) is called a hydria o As equipment for drinking parties  The Greeks drank their wine diluted with water  Wide-mouthed mixing bowl called krater  Oinochoe was a jug used like a “spoon” to dip the mixed water and wine out to be poured into a delicate cup called kylix or a more humble mug called skyphos o As vessels used in connection with personal adornment  Olive oil was VIP in Greek life (cooking, lighting, cl eaning the body, perfumes)  A lekythos could hold 1-2 liters of olive oil and has a narrow neck to restrain flow  An alabastron is a small flask with a constricted neck from which a lady can shake out a few drops of perfume  An aryballos is a smaller, rounder flask
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