Textbook Notes (378,537)
CA (167,156)
UTSC (19,214)
BIOA02H3 (153)
Chapter 54

Chapter 54

2 Pages
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Department
Biological Sciences
Course Code
BIOA02H3
Professor
Kamini Persaud

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Ecological communities are not assemblages that move together as a unit. Each
species has unique interactions with its environment
Trophic levels are a useful way of thinking about energy flow in a community
Primary producers (photosynthesizers) produce ATP which nearly all other
organisms consume
Primary consumers (heterotrophs) consume either directly or indirectly the ATP
produced by primary producers
Organisms that eat primary consumers are secondary consumers
Organisms that eat the dead bodies are decomposers
Food chains are interconnected to make a food web
Energy is lost between trophic levels it decreases going from lower to higher trophic
levels except in aquatic systems which is the opposite.
Commensalism is the interaction in which one participant benefits but the other is
unaffected
Amensalism is interaction in which one participant is harmed but the other is
unaffected
As predator populations grow it reduces size of prey population then predators run
out of food so the population of predators decreases
Prey species have evolved harder ways to be captured, however predators have found
efficient ways to capture
For microparasite populations to persist new hosts must become infected before the
current host dies. Microparasites can invade a host population with many
susceptible individuals. Microparasite population decreases as more hosts become
immune
Interference competition is when one species interferes with the activities of another
and Exploitation competition is when one species reduces the availability of a
resource
Competition can be intraspecific or interspecific
A species that exerts influence out of proportion with its abundance is called a
keystone species
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Description
Ecological communities are not assemblages that move together as a unit. Each species has unique interactions with its environment Trophic levels are a useful way of thinking about energy flow in a community Primary producers (photosynthesizers) produce ATP which nearly all other organisms consume Primary consumers (heterotrophs) consume either directly or indirectly the ATP produced by primary producers Organisms that eat primary consumers are secondary consumers Organisms that eat the dead bodies are decomposers Food chains are interconnected to make a food web Energy is lost between trophic levels it decreases going from lower to higher trophic levels except in aquatic systems which is the opposite. Commensalism is the interaction in which one participant benefits but the other is unaffected Amensalism is interaction in which one participant is harmed but the other
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