Textbook Notes (290,000)
CA (170,000)
UTSC (20,000)
English (90)
ENGB30 (10)
Chapter

In the beginning


Department
English
Course Code
ENGB30
Professor
Laura Jane Wey

This preview shows pages 1-3. to view the full 19 pages of the document.
Biblical and classical myths: the mythological framework of
western culture
Author(s) Frye, Northrop ; Macpherson, Jay
Imprint Toronto, Ont. : University of Toronto Press, 2004
Extent xiv, 471 p.
Topic BL
Subject(s) Mythology, Classical; Myth in the Bible
Language English
ISBN 9780802039279, 0802086950, 0802039278
Permalink http://books.scholarsportal.info/viewdoc.html?id=39168
Pages 296 to 313

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Eros
I.
In the
Beginning
The
Creation
In
the
beginning
how the
heavens
and
earth
Rose
out of
Chaos
...
Milton
In
the
beginning,
before
the
heavens
and the
earth,
all
there
was was
Chaos,
the
dark
and
formless
void.
And
after
ages
of
time
had
passed,
there
appeared
two
tremendous beings,
the
most ancient goddess Night
and her
brother Erebus,
the
Depth.
And
from
these
two was
born Eros,
who is
Love,
the
most powerful
of all the
gods.1
After
him
arose Gaia,
the
great Earth-Mother,
who
brought
forth
from
herself
first
the
worl
d
we
live
on and
then Uranus,
the
starry sky, that lies above
and
around
her and is the
eternal home
of the
blessed
gods.
Then subtle Eros
brought
the
Earth-Mother
and the
Sky-Father together
in
love,
and
from
them
in the
course
of
time were born
a
series
of
strange
and
monstrous creatures,
the
early births
of
time. First came
the
three broth-
ers
Gyes,
Cottus,
and
Briareos, huger than mountains,
fifty-headed
and
hundred-handed,
terrifying
to
look upon.
So at
least thought their
father
Uranus,
and he
took them
from
their mother
and
shut
them
up in
the
dark places under
the
earth.
Gaia
next bore
the
three Cyclopes,
the
Wheel-Eyed
ones, smaller than
the
Hundred-Handed
but
still giants,

Only pages 1-3 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

280
Four Ages:
The
Classical Myths
and
each having
a
single round
eye in the
centre
of his
forehead. These
too
their
father
shut away
in the
earth,
afraid
less
of
their size
and
strength than
of
their skill
at
forging
metal
weapons,
for
they were
the
first
smiths.
The
last children
of
Gaia
were
the
twelve
Titans,
six
sons
and six
daughters, larger than mortal
men but not
monstrous, endowed with
beauty
and
majesty.
Then Gaia, weary
of
Uranus'
cruel treatment
of her
other
children,
appealed
to her
Titan sons
to
avenge their
sufferings.
She
offered
them
a
sharp sickle
of
adamant,2
the
hardest
of
stones, with
which
to
wound their
father
and
drive
him
away. Only
Cronus,3
the
youngest
and
bravest, dared attempt such
a
deed.
He
waited until
night
fell
and
Uranus came down
to
embrace Gaia; then
he
took
the
sickle
and
maimed
his
father,
severing
the
embrace
of
Earth
and
Sky.
Then
Cronus ruled
in his
father's
place over
the
whole world;
but he
would
not
release
his
monstrous elder brothers
from
their captivity
under
the
earth.
The
six
Titan brothers took their
six
sisters
for
wives,
and
their
progeny were
the
gods that
fill the
land
and sea and
air.
To his
oldest
brother
Oceanus,4
Cronus gave
the
stream that girdles
the
earth,
and
his
children were
the
deities
of the
water.
His
innumerable sons were
the
Rivers
of the
earth,
and his
daughters were
the
Nymphs
of
fountain,
lake,
and
stream,
as
well
as of the
sea.5
The
Nymphs
are a
gentle
and
kindly race, beloved
by
gods
and
men;
but one of
them, whose name
is
Styx,
the
Hateful,
is
unlike
the
others.
Her
stream
rises
in a
sunless
underground cavern
and her
waters
are
chill
and
numbing
to the
heart.
Even
the
gods
if
they swear
by
Styx
fear
to
break their oath.
The
most
beautiful
of
Uranus' Titan children were
the
light-god
Hyperion
and his
sister-wife
Thea,
who
lived
in a
palace
of
clouds
in
the
eastern
sky and
whose children were Helios
the
Sun, Selene
the
Moon,
and Eos the
Dawn.
Eos
became
the
mother
of
Phosphorus
the
Morning Star,
Hesperus
the
Evening
Star,6
and the
Planets,
the
wander-
ing
stars.7
Her
other children
are
Eurus,
Zephyrus,
Notus,
and
Boreas,
the
Four Winds that blow
from
east, west, south,
and
north.
The
Golden
Age
For
during Saturn's ancient reign
it's
said
That
all the
world with goodness
did
abound:
All
loved virtue,
no man was
afraid
Of
force,
ne
fraud
in
wight
was to be
found:
No
war was
known,
no
dreadful
trumpet's sound,
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version