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Chapter

ENGB30 Chapter Notes -Northrop Frye, Triptolemus, Metanira


Department
English
Course Code
ENGB30
Professor
Laura Jane Wey

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Biblical and classical myths: the mythological framework of
western culture
Author(s) Frye, Northrop ; Macpherson, Jay
Imprint Toronto, Ont. : University of Toronto Press, 2004
Extent xiv, 471 p.
Topic BL
Subject(s) Mythology, Classical; Myth in the Bible
Language English
ISBN 9780802039279, 0802086950, 0802039278
Permalink http://books.scholarsportal.info/viewdoc.html?id=39168
Pages 313 to 333

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Demeter, Triptolemus, Persephone
1
II.
Spring
and
Winter
Demeter
and
Persephone
...
that
fair
field
Of
Enna,
where
Proserpin
gathering
flowers,
Herself
a
fairer
flower,
by
gloomy
Dis
Was
gathered,
which
cost
Ceres
all
that
pain
To
seek
her
through
the
world.
Milton
There
was a
time when
the
corn-mother Demeter,
the
sister
and at the
same time
one of the
wives
of
Zeus, poured
out her
blessings
on the
earth
in the
same abundance
all the
year round. That
was
before
her
griefs
estranged
her
from
the
councils
of the
gods.
Demeter
bore
a
child
to
Zeus,
the
slender-ankled
maiden Persephone,
who
grew
up in
surpassing beauty. When Zeus' brother Hades,
the
dark ruler
of the
underworld, asked
for her in
marriage, Zeus swore
that
he
should
have her, whatever
her
mother might say.
The two
brothers called
in
Earth
to
help them,
and the
three
of
them together
laid
a
plot.

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Demeter
and
Persephone
297
One day
Persephone went
to
play with
the
daughters
of
Ocean
in the
meadows
of
Enna
in
Sicily,
away
from
her
mother,
and
wandered here
and
there with
her
companions gathering
the
flowers
of all the
seasons
that
were blooming there together.
At the
will
of
Zeus Earth sent
up
from
her lap a new
flower,
a
wonderful
sight
for
mortal
men or
death-
less gods,
a
bright
narcissus2
with
a
hundred blooms growing
from
its
single stalk.
The
sweetness
of its
perfume
delighted
the
heavens
and
the
earth
and
made
the sea
laugh
for
joy. Persephone stood amazed
at
the flower's
beauty; then
as she
stretched
out her
hand
to
pick
it,
suddenly
the
earth gaped,
a
wide chasm opened
at her
feet,
and out of
it
sprang Hades
in his
golden
chariot,
drawn
by
deathless coal-black
horses. Seizing
her
before
she
could
find
the
power
to
move,
he set her
in his
chariot
and
drove
the
horses
forward.
As
long
as
Persephone could still
see the
earth
and the
broad
sky and
the sea
with
its
crowding
fish,
she was
calm
and
quiet.
But
when
the
tall
gates
of
Hades'
realm came
in
sight
and
earth seemed
to be
lost behind
her,
she
gave
a
shrill cry,
so
that
the
heights
of the
mountains
and the
depths
of the sea
rang with
her
immortal voice.
Her
father
Zeus heard
her, sitting
in his
temple receiving
the
offerings
of
men,
and
rejoiced
that
his
design
had
been carried out.
Her
mother Demeter heard her,
and the cry
filled
her
heart with
grief
and
fear.
She
rent
her
headdress
apart with
her
hands,
and
casting over
her
shoulders
a
dark blue cloak,
she
hastened like
a
wild bird
in
search
of her
child, over
the
firm
ground
and the
unstable sea.
But
there
was no one who was
willing
to
tell
her the
truth, even among those
who
knew
it. For
nine days
and
nights
majestic
Demeter searched over
the
earth, with
flaming
torches
in her
hands,
so
grieved that
she
would neither partake
of the
food
of
the
gods
nor
refresh
her
body with water.
On
the
tenth
day the
dark goddess Hecate approached her, with
a
torch
in her
hand, saying: "Lady Demeter,
who
brings
on the
season
and
bestows good
gifts,
who of
heavenly gods
or
mortal
men
has
stolen
away
Persephone
and
pierced your heart with sorrow?
For I
heard
her
voice
as she
cried out,
but I did not see the
event."
Together
Hecate
and
Demeter approached
the
sun-god Helios,
who
watches
the
doings
of
both gods
and
men. Standing
before
his
horses,
Demeter
asked
him
whether
he had
seen
the
theft
of her
child. Helios
replied
to
her: "Queen Demeter, daughter
of
Rhea,
I
pity
you in
your
grief
for
your
slim-ankled
daughter.
One
alone
of all the
deathless gods
is
to
blame,
and
that
is
cloud-gathering Zeus,
who
gave
her to his
brother
to
wife;
and
Hades
it was who
seized her,
and
took
her in his
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