EESA10H3 LECTURE 2 CHAPTER 2.docx

7 Pages
153 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Environmental Science
Course
EESA10H3
Professor
Stefanovic- Universityof Toronto( U T S C)
Semester
Winter

Description
EESA10H3 WEEK 2: 13.01.14 URBAN AND TRANSBOUNDARY AIR POLLUTION ­ In 1700, epidemiologist and physician Ramazzini published first textbook on  occupational disease, describing detail respiratory disease with the exposure of  silica, cotton, tobacco, flour, etc.  ­ Air pollution resulting in serious illnesses and death, especially amongst those  with cardiopulmonary disease, in Belgium, Pennsylvania, and London were  caused by air stagnation o Air stagnation greatly increased atmospheric pollutants, especially sulfur  dioxide and other suspended particulates  ­ After these epidemics, scientists and governments paid increased attention to the  health effects of air pollution  o I.e. identifying specific pollutant sources and their transport in  atmosphere, elucidating exposure­response relationships, and developing  air pollution control ­ Despite efforts, air pollution still occurs today because: 1. Of changes in atmosphere resulting in the transportation, dilution,  precipitation, and transformation of contaminants  2. Primary emissions of heavy metals (i.e. cadmium and lead), sulfur and  nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and respirable particulates severely  polluting cities and towns in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Eastern  Europe  Poorer countries rely on heavily on coal thus had significantly  higher levels of total suspended particulates (TSP)  3. Nations that have reduced primary emissions have caused air pollution  through secondary formation of acids and ozone and from newer  industries  Resulting high levels of air pollution contribute heavily to high  mortality rates observed for acute respiratory disease (~4 million  per year) in children under the age of 5 in many developing  countries ­ There are many other aspects of how damaging air pollutants are  o I.e. damage to ecosystems and agriculture from acid rain Defining Adverse Health Effects  ­ What constitutes an adverse health effect has been a subject of scientific debate  but for the purpose of this review, an adverse health effect is any effect that  results in altered structure of impaired function or that represents the beginning of  a sequence of events leading to altered structure or function  1 Specific Air Pollutants Associated with Adverse Respiratory Effects ­ Several major types of air pollution are currently recognized to cause adverse  respiratory health effects: sulfur oxides and acidic particulate complexes,  photochemical oxidants, and miscellaneous category of pollutants arising from  industrial sources Pollutant Sources Health effects Sulfur oxides,  • Coal and oil power  • Bronchoconstriction particulates plants • Chronic bronchitis • Oil refineries,  • Chronic obstructive  smelters pulmonary disease  • Stoves burning  (COPD) wood, coal, and  kerosene Carbon monoxide • Motor vehicle  • Asphyxia leading to  emissions heart and nervous system  • Fossil­fuel burning damage, death Oxides of nitrogen  • Automobile  • Airway injury (NO x emissions • Pulmonary edema • Fossil­fuel power  • Impaired lung defenses plants • Oil refineries  Ozone (O 3 • Automobile  • Same as NO x emissions • Ozone generators • Aircraft cabins Polycyclic aromatic  • Diesel exhaust • Lung cancer hydrocarbons • Cigarette smoke • Stove smoke Radon • Natural • Lung cancer Asbestos  • Asbestos mines  • Mesothelioma and mills • Lung cancer • Insulation • Asbestosis • Building materials Arsenic • Copper smelters • Lung cancer • Cigarette smoke Allergens • Pollen • Asthma • Animal dander • Rhinitis • House dust 2 Sulfur Dioxide and Acidic Aerosols  ­ Sulfur dioxide (SO ) i2 produced by the combustion of sulfur contained in fossil  fuels i.e. coal or crude oil o Clear and highly water­soluble gas thus effectively absorbed the mucous  membranes of the upper airways, and smaller proportions reaching distal  regions of the lungs ­ Sulfur dioxide released into the environment doesn’t remain gaseous; undergoes  chemical reactions with water, metals, and other pollutants to form aerosols ­ 1970s by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed statutory  regulations under the Clean Air Act resulting in significant reductions in levels of  SO a2  particulates ­ They were able to do this by using tall stacks, thus releasing the pollutants high  into the atmosphere o Prolonged residence time allowed these pollutants to transform into acidic  aerosols i.e. sulfuric acids, metallic acids, and ammonium sulfates ­ In addition to smog, – visibly cloudy combination of smoke and fog – acidic  aerosol has shown to induce asthmatic responses in both adults and children ­ Harvard Six Cities Study demonstrated a significant association between chronic  cough and bronchitis and hydrogen ion concentrations (a measure of acidity)  rather than sulfate levels or total particulate levels 3 ­ Higher particle acidity (nmol/m ) was significantly associated with increased risk  of bronchitis and higher levels of gaseous acids were significantly associated with  the risk of asthma ­ Acute bronchoconstrictive effects of sulfur dioxide have been well known for ~30  years o I.e. inhalation of high concentrations of SO  show2 to increase airway  resistance in healthy normal volunteers and profoundly in asthmatics o Though the concentration of sulfur dioxide is significantly higher than in  cities (i.e. 5ppm), other human studies show that patients with asthma are  extremely sensitive and react to much lower levels o Since SO is 2 ghly water soluble, nearly all inspired sulfur dioxide gas is  removed in the upper airways during rest o Exertion will increase the fraction of sulfur dioxide remaining to lower  airways and help precipitate bronchoconstriction Particulates ­ Particulate air pollution is closely related to SO and aerosols  2  Particulates usually refer to particles suspended in the air after various forms of  combustion or other industrial activities.  ­ A study performed between 1974­84 revealed that the total suspended particulate  counts were significantly associated with increased daily mortality, with season  and temperature controlled  ­ Recent interest in particulate air pollution has focused in particle size, specifically  those that <2.5 microns in diameter (PM , also2.5lled “fine” particles) 3 o “Fine” particles almost exclusively come from combustion sources and  have been studied under the hypothesis that these particles are able to  penetrate lungs while larger particles would be trapped in the upper airway  Fine particles from mobile sources, coal combustion, and crustal  particles (i.e. dirt) were studied; both mobile and coal sources were  significantly associated with daily mortality however, crustal  sources not so much  Fine particles are also significantly associated with respiratory  symptoms and decrements in peak flow measurements  ­ Research began to examine the relationship between particulate levels with subtle  changes in heart­rate variability (HVR), a measure of the cyclic variations of  beat­to­beat intervals and the instantaneous heart rate ­ Clinical implications of changes in HVR aren’t completely understood; however,  there’s evidence that reduced HVR is a risk factor for adverse cardiac events i.e.  angina, myocardial infraction (MI), life­threatening arrhythmias, and congestive  heart failure ­ Effects of increased levels of fine particles on HVR was examined by Gold and  colleagues o Continuously monitoring heart rate for 25 minutes per week, including  five minutes each of standing, outdoor exercise, recovery from exercise,  and rest, researchers demonstrated a significant reduction in HRV  associated with higher levels of fine­partic
More Less

Related notes for EESA10H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit