EESA10H3 LECTURE 5 CHAPTER 4.docx

8 Pages
88 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Environmental Science
Course
EESA10H3
Professor
Stefanovic- Universityof Toronto( U T S C)
Semester
Winter

Description
EESA10H3 WEEK 5: 03.02.14 HUMAN HEALTH AND HEAVY METALS EXPOSURE ­ Metals, a major category of globally distributed pollutants, are natural elements  that have been extracted from the earth and harnessed for human industry and  products for millennia (exception of natural metals is plutonium)  o Notable for wide environmental dispersion o Tendency to accumulate in select tissues of the body o Overall potential to be toxic in low levels of exposure ­ Some metals (i.e. copper and iron) essential to life and play roles in, for example,  the functioning of critical enzyme systems ­ Other metals are xenobiotics – have no useful role in human physiology (and most  other living organisms) – and may be toxic even at trace levels of exposure ­ Even essential metals can be toxic at high levels, reflecting basic tenet of  toxicology – “the dose makes the poison”  ­ U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) lists all hazards  present in toxic waste sites according to prevalence and severity  o First, second, third, and sixth hazards respectively on the list are heavy  metals: lead, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium ­ Exposure to metals can occur through variety of routes o May be inhaled as dust or fume (tiny particulate matter, i.e. lead oxide  particles produced by combustion of leaded gasoline) o May be vaporized (i.e. mercury vapor in manufacturing fluorescent lamps)  and inhaled o May be ingested involuntarily through food and drink  Amount actually absorbed by digestive tract vary widely  depending on chemical form of metal and age and nutritional status  of individual  Once absorbed, distributes in tissues and organs  Excretion occurs through kidneys and digestive tract, but metals  tend to persist in some storage sites i.e. liver, bones, and kidneys ­ Toxicity of metals involves the brain and kidney, but other manifestations occur;  some metals, i.e. arsenic, capable of causing cancer ­ Individual with metals toxicity regardless of dose, typically has general symptoms  i.e. weakness or headache ­ Diagnosis of which metals responsible quite difficult  ­ Chronic exposure at high enough levels causes chronic toxicity effects (i.e.  hypertension in those exposed to lead and renal toxicity in those exposed to  cadmium) to those who have no symptoms Lead Exposure 1 ­ Lead has been mined and used in industry and in household products ­ Modern industrialization resulted in marked rise in population exposures in the  twentieth century ­ Dominant source of worldwide dispersion of lead for the past 50 years was the  use of lead organic compounds as antiknock motor vehicle fuel additives ­ Since leaded gasoline introduced in 1923, its combustion and resulting  contamination of atmosphere increased background levels everywhere, incl. ice  cap covering Northern Greenland where there’s no industry and few cars and  people ­ Current annual worldwide production of lead is ~5.4 million tons and continues to  rise ­ 60% is used for the manufacturing of batteries, while remainder is used in  production of pigments, glazes, solder, plastics, and a variety of other products ­ In response to risks, many developed countries over last 25 years implemented  regulatory action that effectively decreased actual exposures to general population o Exposures remain high or increasing in developing countries through  increase vehicles combusting leaded gasoline ­ Number of factors can modify impact of lead exposures o I.e. water with lower pH will leach more lead out of plumbing connected  by lead solder than more alkaline water will ­ Lead from soil tends to concentrate in root vegetables (i.e. onions) and leafy green  vegetables (i.e. spinach) ­ Individuals will absorb more lead in their food if their diets are deficient in  calcium, iron, or zinc ­ Lead also found in improperly glazed ceramics, lead crystal, imported candies Toxicity ­ Studies in humans were greatly assisted by development of methods (i.e. graphic  furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy) for accurate and reliable measurements  of lead in blood  ­ Depending on dose, lead exposure in children and adults can cause wide variety  of health problems, ranging from convulsions, coma, renal failure, and death at  high end to subtle effects on metabolism and intelligence ­ Children and developing fetus especially vulnerable to neurotoxic effects ­ Low­level lead exposure in children less than five years results in deficits in  intellectual development, manifested by lost IQ points; United States, Center of  Disease Control, pushed allowable amount of lead in blood from 25 to 10m g/dL,  recommended universal blood­lead screening of all children between ages six  months and five years ­ Number of issues still remain unsolved with respect to lead toxicity in children o Risk to the fetus posed by mobilization of long­lived skeletal stores of lead  in pregnant women 2  Research shows maternal bone­lead stores mobilize at accelerated  rate during pregnancy and lactation and are associated with  decrements in birth weight, growth rate, and mental development  Because bone­lead stores persist for decades, it’s possible that lead  can remain a threat to fetal health many years after environmental  exposure curtailed o Adults generally allowed by regulations to be exposed to higher amounts  of lead  In the states, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration  requires that blood­lead levels be maintained at 40m g/dL,  preventing toxic effects to nerves, brain, kidneys, reproductive  organs, and heart  Standard probably outdated because of following: → Standard doesn’t protect the fetuses of women who become  pregnant while on the job (or years after because of issue of  bone­lead mobilization discussed above) → Epidemiologic studies linked blood­lead levels in the range  of 7­40m g/dL with evidence of toxicity in adults, i.e.  neurobehavioral decrements and renal impairments → Using K­x­ray fluorescence to directly measure bone­lead  levels (as opposed to blood­lead levels) have provided  evidence that cumulative lead exposure in individuals with  blood­lead levels well below 40m g/dL is a major risk factor  for the development of hypertension, cardiac conduction  delays, and cognitive impairments Mercury Exposure ­ In pure form, metallic mercury is liquid ­ Not hazardous if ingested because it’s not absorbed significantly in this form ­ If left standing, or even worse, if aerosolized – i.e. through attempted vacuum  cleaning – metallic mercury will volatize into vapor that is well absorbed by lungs ­ Mercurous and mercuric mercury (Hg and Hg , respectively) are encountered in  some chemical, metal­processing, electrical­equipment, automotive, and building  industries in medical or dental services ­ Mercuruous and mercuric mercury form inorganic and organic compounds with  other chemicals that can be readily absorbed through ingestion ­ All three forms of mercury are toxic to various degrees ­ Globally, mercury has been increasing in importance as widespread contaminant o ~1/2 of National Priority List toxic waste sites in the states contain  mercury ­ Mercury dispersion through atmosphere increased markedly through waste  incineration; medical industry is one of largest contributors to mercury pollution  in this fashion 3 ­ Brazil seen widespread mercury contamination through combination use in gold  mining and deforestation ­ When deposited in soil, organic mercury compounds broken down slowly into  inorganic compounds; inorganic mercury can be converted by mircoorganisms in  soil and water into organic compound methyl mercury, which is then  bioconcentrated up food chain ­ Fish (i.e. tuna, king mackerel, and swordfish) can concentrate methyl mercury at  high levels Toxicity ­ High levels of mercury exposure that occur through, for example, inhalation of  mercury vapors generated by thermal volatilization can lead to life­threatening  injuries to lungs and neurological system ­ Lower but more chronic levels of exposures, typical constellation of findings  arises, termed erethism – with tremor of the hands, excitability, memory loss,  insomnia, timidity, and sometimes delirium – that was once commonly seen in  workers exposed to mercury in felt­hats ­ Modest levels of occupational mercury experienced by dentists, have been 
More Less

Related notes for EESA10H3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit