Textbook Notes (378,371)
CA (167,127)
UTSC (19,207)
Geography (159)
GGRC02H3 (16)
Elrick (2)
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week1chapternoes

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Department
Geography
Course Code
GGRC02H3
Professor
Elrick

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GGRC02 Week 1 Reading Notes
NewBold pg 1-18
-17th Century world population about 500 million
-advances in medicine, sanitation and nutrition allowed population to grow faster.
-1900 the world population was 2 billion, in 2009 population was 6.8 billion.
-Most of that growth occurred in developing world and future population growth will take place there due
to higher birth rates, reduced death rates, and young populations.
-Infant mortality rate (IMR): the number of deaths to infants less than 1 year old per 1000 births
-6 in developed world, with world average of 46
-life expectancy at birth: number of years a person is expected to live.
-77 in developed countries, 67 in developing countries.
-poor life expectancy reflect inadequate health care, failure of governments to provide basic needs, or
educational differences.
-population movement: local residential changes, domestic migration due to job/amenities, international
migration.
-who moves is just as important as origins and destination of migrants. Most developed countries want
people who can invest in the country or have education/skills that are demanded by developed nations.
-refugees: persons who are outside their country of nationality and cannot return due to fear of
persecution for reason of race, religion, nationality or association in social/political group.
-illegal immigrants and refugees dominate international movement of people.
What is population geography and why study it?
-study of human population with respect to size, composition, spatial distribution and changes that occur
over time.
-Populations altered by 1) fertility (births), 2) mortality (deaths), 3) migration (movement of people)
-geographical study of population, with emphasis on location and spatial processes
-populations are governed by various natural laws- we are all born, age and must ultimately die
-geographers do not deal exclusively with space, but the understanding of spatial processes.
-6 research themes:
1) internal migration and residential mobility
2) international migration and transnationalism
3) immigrant assimilation and adjustment and the emergence of ethnic enclaves
4) regional demographic variations
5) social theory and population processes
6) public policy
-there is variety of spatial scale from individual to international
-changing scale of analysis implies that different set of questions and potentially methods must be
applied to the problem.
-changing spatial scale often changes what we can physically observe
-MAUP: modifiable areal unit problem affects studies that utilize aggregate data sources and
Is closely related to an ecological fallacy.
-preference to use smallest, and most meaningful spatial scale: only good with reliable sources
-data is important. Data sources usually from US census bureau or other statistical agencies
-Qualitative data:
-Non-numerical information such as text, images, or verbal descriptions.
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Description
GGRC02 Week 1 Reading Notes NewBold pg 1-18 -17 Century world population about 500 million -advances in medicine, sanitation and nutrition allowed population to grow faster. -1900 the world population was 2 billion, in 2009 population was 6.8 billion. -Most of that growth occurred in developing world and future population growth will take place there due to higher birth rates, reduced death rates, and young populations. -Infant mortality rate (IMR): the number of deaths to infants less than 1 year old per 1000 births -6 in developed world, with world average of 46 -life expectancy at birth: number of years a person is expected to live. -77 in developed countries, 67 in developing countries. -poor life expectancy reflect inadequate health care, failure of governments to provide basic needs, or educational differences. -population movement: local residential changes, domestic migration due to jobamenities, international migration. -who moves is just as important as origins and destination of migrants. Most developed countries want people who can invest in the country or have educationskills that are demanded by developed nations. -refugees: persons who are outside their country of nationality and cannot return due to fear of persecution for reason of race, religion, nationality or association in socialpolitical group. -illegal immigrants and refugees dominate international movement of people. What is population geography and why study it? -study of human population with respect to size, composition, spatial
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