Textbook Notes (378,371)
CA (167,127)
UTSC (19,207)
HLTA02H3 (165)
Anna Walsh (16)
Chapter 15

Chapter 15 notes

6 Pages
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Department
Health Studies
Course Code
HLTA02H3
Professor
Anna Walsh

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Hltb03Chapter 15
-Inequalities of wealth and income produce unequal life chances and opportunities
for material and social rewardspoverty translates into homelessness, ill health,
short life expectancy, etc
Inequality and poverty
-Income inequalities is an important dimension of social stratificationthere are
wide income disparities among Canadians
-A significant number of Canadians live in povertythe number of poor people was
nearly 5 million in 2003 and the poverty rate was nearly 16%
- Child poverty figures follow the same general patternin 2003, 1.2 children lived in
pover at a rate of ~16.7%
-Poverty rates are relative low for two parent families and quite high for families
with single parent mothers
-These income disparities produce an inequality of opportunities and life chances,
and have negative outcomes for individuals in low income and poor families
-Poverty of opportunities and family income levels are factors detrimental to healthy
child development and child well being
Inequality, poverty and health status
-Social medicine is primarily concerned with the social, economic and environmental
conditions in society that produce patterns of morbidity and mortality
- Those who are advantaged with respect to socio economic status are also
advantaged in health statusthey live longer, healthier and more disability- free
lives on average than those who are poor
-Research finding found evidence of association between social structural
determinants and the variation in health risks and health outcomes for children
Infant mortality
-Infant mortality is one of the most important indicators of population health
because of its association with adult mortality and life expectancy
-Infant mortality in Canada has declined steadily
-Overall infant deaths have decline substantially, class, race and regional differences
persist in affecting child health
www.notesolution.com
Hltb03Chapter 15
-Infant mortality in the Aboriginal population is almost twice that of the general
population
-Disparities in birth outcomes are linked to neighborhood incomethe poorest
neighborhoods have twice the infant mortality rates of children in the richest
neighborhoods
- Infant mortality rates vary by income groups
-With respect to infant mortality, Canada does not rank favorably with other
advanced countries; its standing has declined in recent years
-Association between socio economic status and health status arises very early in life
the first injusticewhich is followed by an enduring association between SES and
the risk of death that persists throughout adult life
Health at birthbirth outcomes and birth weight
-Weight at birth is one of the most important measures of overall health and well
being later in life
-Low birth weight is less than 5.5 lbs, and average weight is 7.5
-Low birth weight is a major cause of infant mortality
-Children who survive face a high risk of other developmental and health related
problems, such as impaired learning and neurodevelopment, loss of sight and
hearing
-Negative effects of low birth weight extends into adult life and contributes to
differences in mortality
-Factors associated with low birth weightmothers age, health, tobacco and alcohol
use during pregnancy, nutrition and premature delivery
-Low birth weight children are likely to be born to very young mothers (10-14) and
older mothers ( 45 and older)
- Premature babies account for over half of low birth weight infantsteen mothers
and the unborn child are at risk of poor nutrition and poor health outcomes
-Children born into poverty encounter a wide range of negative health outcomes
and those of poverty are at higher
www.notesolution.com

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Description
Hltb03Chapter 15 - Inequalities of wealth and income produce unequal life chances and opportunities for material and social rewardspoverty translates into homelessness, ill health, short life expectancy, etc Inequality and poverty - Income inequalities is an important dimension of social stratificationthere are wide income disparities among Canadians - A significant number of Canadians live in povertythe number of poor people was nearly 5 million in 2003 and the poverty rate was nearly 16% - Child poverty figures follow the same general patternin 2003, 1.2 children lived in pover at a rate of ~16.7% - Poverty rates are relative low for two parent families and quite high for families with single parent mothers - These income disparities produce an inequality of opportunities and life chances, and have negative outcomes for individuals in low income and poor families - Poverty of opportunities and family income levels are factors detrimental to healthy child development and child well being Inequality, poverty and health status - Social medicine is primarily concerned with the social, economic and environmental conditions in society that produce patterns of morbidity and mortality - Those who are advantaged with respect to socio economic status are also advantaged in health statusthey live longer, healthier and more disability- free lives on average than those who are poor - Research finding found evidence of association between social structural determinants and the variation in health risks and health outcomes for children Infant mortality - Infant mortality is one of the most important indicators of population health because of its association with adult mortality and life expectancy - Infant mortality in Canada has declined steadily - Overall infant deaths have decline substantially, class, race and regional differences persist in affecting child health www.notesolution.com
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