Textbook Notes (378,353)
CA (167,126)
UTSC (19,207)
HLTB21H3 (177)
Chapter 14

Chapter 14 study guide

3 Pages
89 Views

Department
Health Studies
Course Code
HLTB21H3
Professor
Caroline Barakat

This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full 3 pages of the document.
Plagues and People Chapter Notes:
Chapter 14: Leprosy, the Striking Hand of God:
Job from the Old Testament probably suffered from leprosy, considered
the patron of lepers.
Arose in the Far East around 1400 BC, description sin Hindu writings
and in Chinese literature.
Claimed that it was brought from India to Greece in the 4 century BC
by soldiers of Alexander the Great OR spread from Far East to the
west along trade routes.
Emperor Constantine suffered from leprosy and believed that bathign
in the blood of sacrificed children would cure him
Hebrew word saraath, was translated into Greek it became lepros, then
the Latinized version was lepra, and the English translation was
translated into leprosy.
Leprosy became accepted as a divine punishment for the sins of the
flesh.
1179, lepers were told not to mix with crowds and use own contained to
draw water, not touch anything unless it was paid for first, where a
distinctive garment and announce presence with a bell or clapper.
Henry II and Phillip V strapped lepers to a post and burned them
alive.
Edward I was considered kinder he buried them alive instead.
Refugee houses were established for them, called lazar houses or
lazarets (after Lazarus of Bethany who suffered from leprosy)
Epidemic in the 12th century and peaked in Europe in the 13th and 14th
century.
In the 1300s leprosy may have retreated because of the rising incidence
of pulmonary tuberculosis, which led to resistance to leprosy.
Leprosy spread from Spain and Africa to the Americas in the 16th and
17th centuries
1860s Americans and Europeans who lived in Hawaii feared the
disease, so lepers were loaded onto ships and went to a settlement at
Kalawao.
1865 a leper colony was established on Molokai
Father Damien joined the colony (stayed for 16 years) provided comfort
and compassion to them, did not avoid contact with them, and died in
1889 after contracting the disease.
In 1894 in the state of Louisiana they established a home for lepers,
and was a neglected asylum.
www.notesolution.com

Loved by over 2.2 million students

Over 90% improved by at least one letter grade.

Leah — University of Toronto

OneClass has been such a huge help in my studies at UofT especially since I am a transfer student. OneClass is the study buddy I never had before and definitely gives me the extra push to get from a B to an A!

Leah — University of Toronto
Saarim — University of Michigan

Balancing social life With academics can be difficult, that is why I'm so glad that OneClass is out there where I can find the top notes for all of my classes. Now I can be the all-star student I want to be.

Saarim — University of Michigan
Jenna — University of Wisconsin

As a college student living on a college budget, I love how easy it is to earn gift cards just by submitting my notes.

Jenna — University of Wisconsin
Anne — University of California

OneClass has allowed me to catch up with my most difficult course! #lifesaver

Anne — University of California
Description
Plagues and People Chapter Notes: Chapter 14: Leprosy, the Striking Hand of God: Job from the Old Testament probably suffered from leprosy, considered the patron of lepers. Arose in the Far East around 1400 BC, description sin Hindu writings and in Chinese literature. Claimed that it was brought from India to Greece in the 4 century BC by soldiers of Alexander the Great OR spread from Far East to the west along trade routes. Emperor Constantine suffered from leprosy and believed that bathign in the blood of sacrificed children would cure him Hebrew word saraath, was translated into Greek it became lepros, then the Latinized version was lepra, and the English translation was translated into leprosy. Leprosy became accepted as a divine punishment for the sins of the flesh. 1179, lepers were told not to mix with crowds and use own contained to draw water, not touch anything unless it was paid for first, where a distinctive garment and announce presence with a bell or clapper. Henry II and Phillip V strapped lepers to a post and burned them
More Less
Unlock Document


Only page 1 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

Unlock Document
You're Reading a Preview

Unlock to view full version

Unlock Document

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit